Parashat Vayakhel-Pekudei

(And He Assembled-Accountings Of)

Exodus 35:1 - 40:38

Ezekiel 45:16 - 46:18 | Shabbat HaChodesh

In the Torah portion Vayakhel, God commands the Israelites not to do any work in the sanctuary on Shabbat. The Israelites gather gifts for God. Moses says that Ohaliab and Bezalel should take the gifts of the Israelites and build God’s Sanctuary. In Pekudei, Aaron and the priests are given their clothing for work in the Sanctuary. This marks the completion of the Tabernacle construction. Moses anoints Aaron and his sons to make their priestly positions official. A cloud descends upon the Tent of Meeting, and God’s presence fills the Tabernacle.

Why is Moses Kept Out of the Tabernacle?

How the deepest intimacy can be both binding and freeing.

More on this Torah Portion

A Sacred Moment in Time

What does it look like to think of one day as helping us to balance our lives?

The Power of We

Everyone's contribution, and occasionally sacrifice, is necessary.

Living Up to Our Names

God names Bezalel, giving him inspiration to lead.

The Value of Rest

Vayakhel: A resource for parents.

The Nature of the Cosmos

Why should we care so much about the details of the Tabernacle?

Avoiding Deification in Creating the Mishkan

If the Golden Calf was an abomination, why is the Tabernacle okay?

Six Days Shall You Work

Shabbat is important, yet our behavior during the other six days is no less a part of religious life.

Parashat Pekudei Quiz

Learn more about the weekly Torah portion.

Parashat Vayakhel Quiz

Learn more about the weekly Torah portion.

Team Effort

Building global community, like the construction of the mishkan, requires everyone to participate.

God Is In The Details

The Torah teaches us to think globally and act locally.

Ecology & Shabbat

Shabbat gives us an opportunity to stop trying to control the world.

We Have Only Our Hearts

It is easy to feel disconnected from those who are most unlike us.

Initiative and Self-Sufficiency

God met the Israelites' need to relate to God on their own terms--we must do the same.

Moving Towards Redemption

The messages of hope and togetherness in Vayakhel and Pekudei prepare us for Passover.

Good Governance

Moses exemplifies a lesson in business ethics.

Vayakhel

Exodus 35:1-38:20

The Role Of The Tabernacle

Is the Tabernacle a sacred center of intense love or an outgrowth of our sins?

Keeping Accounts

Moses' account of all of the materials of the Tabernacle is a model for the honesty and transparency with which we should run our businesses.

Parashat Pekudei: Summary

The work of constructing the Tabernacle is completed; Moses receives the command to anoint its vessels and to anoint Aaron and the priests.

Pekudei

Exodus 38:21-40:38

Experiencing God In Dark And Light

We should strive to feel the presence of God in our lives, just as the presence of God filled the Tabernacle.

If It’s Broken, Why Keep It?

The presence of the broken tablets in the Ark reminds us of the value of objects that may not be functional but signify important relationships.

Sacred Relationships

The mirrors used to create the basin in the Tabernacle teach us that sanctified sexuality means seeing ourselves in relation to others.

Clothes Are The Message

The clothing of our religious leaders communicates our perceptions of our relationships to God and each other.

Bezalel, Standing In The Shadow Of God

Bezalel's wise-heartedness was his ability to merge the practical with the contemplative.

On Matters Of The Heart

The image of Israelites, whose hearts moved them, donating gifts to the Tabernacle, inspires us to consider the meaning of having a heart that is moved.

Parashat Vayakhel: Summary

The Israelites bring so many materials for the construction of the Tabernacle that Moses tells them to stop; Bezalel and Oholiab, gifted craftspeople, construct the elements of the Tabernacle.

Table For Two

Our tables, symbolic altars, become tools in our quest for sacredness when we share them with the poor and marginalized.

Spirituality Never Stops

The connections between building the Tabernacle and Yom Kippur reminds us that all aspects of our spirituality are connected.

And The Loveliest Of All Was The Unicorn

The many interpretations of the tachash remind us to look beyond surface appearances for spiritual intensity.