roasted potatoes

Roasted Potatoes for Shabbat

A Friday night staple.

Growing up there were a few things I could count on. Upon hearing my first name strangers would sing the “Tomorrow” song from Annie (note: this has never been funny). My parents’ friend David would dress up as Cookie Monster every Purim. And at Friday night dinner, my mom would serve roasted potatoes with garlic. These things were dependable. There was no deviating. And while I could have done without the constant Annie references, I never tired of my mom’s roasted potatoes. Crispy and flavorful, they worked as a side dish for nearly every meal, and were crowd pleasers, appealing to picky eaters and those with sophisticated palates alike.

I don’t make roasted potatoes quite as often as my mother used to, but they’re definitely on my table at least twice a month.

Try this recipe at your next Shabbat meal.

Ingredients

1 Tablespoon salt

1/4 cup olive oil

pepper to taste

1 Tablespoon Italian spices

1 Tablespoon oregano

6-10 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon thyme

4 lbs mixed potatoes--any kinds, including yams, sweet, purple or fingerling potatoes

Directions

Preheat oven to 400F.

Peel your potatoes. I always peel my sweet and regular potatoes, but leave the skin on new and fingerling potatoes. Rinse potatoes and then quarter them. A large potato should probably be cut into six or so pieces. You want all the pieces of potato to be approximately the same size.

Put the potatoes in a large bowl, and add the garlic and spices. Don’t forget to add a few twists of the pepper grinder. Pour in about half (1/8 cup) of the olive oil. Toss with potatoes and spices. If that doesn’t seem to be enough oil to very lightly coat the potatoes drizzle more on until it seems to be a reasonable amount. Toss again, and then pour the potatoes into a 9×13″ casserole dish. Cover with aluminum foil, and put in the oven. 45 minutes later come back and take off the aluminum foil. Cook for an additional 10-15 minutes, or longer if the potatoes aren’t totally soft yet.

These potatoes are excellent both hot and cold.

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