Israeli Hummus Recipe

You've seen it in the stores. Now you can make it at home.

I have been making hummus for years and have concluded that despite the temptation to use canned chickpeas, the flavor is much better when it is made with dried chickpeas found at Middle Eastern or Indian food stores. First I soak a large quantity overnight, cook some and then drain and freeze the rest in two-cup batches in plastic bags.

Whenever I need them for hummus, falafel,or for chickpea soups and stews, I just take them out of the freezer. When substituting canned beans, figure that one cup of raw chickpeas equals two cups of cooked or canned. Some old-time cooks in the Middle East either peel cooked chickpeas or pass them through a food mill before using them. I find there is no need for this laborious extra step. I add to my hummus a little bit of cumin, which blends beautifully with the garlic and lemony flavor.

Reprinted with permission from The Foods of Israel Today (Knopf).

Ingredients

2 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley or cilantro

2 cloves garlics (or to taste)

2 Tablespoons pine nuts

3 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

ground pepper to taste

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup tahini

1/2 cup lemon juice (or to taste)

1 cup dried chickpeas

Directions

Put the raw chickpeas in a bowl with cold water to cover and soak overnight.

Drain and rinse the chickpeas, then place them in a heavy pot with enough cold water to cover. Bring to a boil, then simmer, partially covered, for about an hour or until the chickpeas are soft and the skin begins to separate. Add more water as needed.

Drain the chickpeas, reserving about 1-1/2 cups of the cooking liquid. Set aside 1/4cup of the cooked chickpeas for garnish. In a food processor fitted with a steel blade, process the remaining chickpeas with the tahini, lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper, cumin and at least 1/2 cup of the reserved cooking liquid. If the hummus is too thick, add more reserved cooking liquid or water until you have a paste-like consistency.

Heat a frying pan and add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Spread the pine nuts in the pan and stir-fry, browning on all sides.

To serve, transfer the hummus to a large, flat plate, and with the back of a spoon make a slight depression in the center. Drizzle the remaining olive oil on top and sprinkle the reserved chickpeas, pine nuts, paprika or sumac, and parsley or cilantro over the surface.

Serve with cut-up raw vegetables and warm pita cut into wedges.

My Jewish Learning is a not-for-profit and relies on your help

Donate

Discover More

Baba Ganoush

An easy recipe for eggplant.

Chickpea Arugula Salad with Creamy Tahini Dressing

A light salad featuring two of the most popular ingredients in Israeli cuisine.

Savory Za’atar Challah

The addition of Middle Eastern spices gives this challah a subtle flavor that is perfect with a savory meal.

Modern Israel at a Glance

An overview of the Jewish state and its many accomplishments and challenges.

Sephardic Cuisine

An overview of the wide variety of food eaten by the descendants of the Spanish exile.

Ashkenazi Cuisine

European Jewish food developed along with the migration of the European Jewish community -- from West to East.

Shabbat Chicken with Dried Fruit Recipe

This go-to chicken recipe, with a glossy and delicious sauce, is perfect for Rosh Hashanah or Shabbat.

Classic Potato Kugel

A grandmother's recipe offers an easy route to this classic Ashkenazi dish.