Our Staff’s Favorite Resources

The Keshet resource library has SO MANY resources that it can be hard to know where to start! From information about the holidays to advice for coming out and tips for allies, to inclusion guides for synagogues, camps, and schools; we have something for everyone and for just about any situation.

So, we’ve asked some of our education team staff members to tell us their favorite Keshet resources and why they love them. Use these as a jumping-off point, and maybe you will find your new favorite resource too!

 

Daniel Bahner

National Director of Education and Training 

Pronouns: he/him/his

Favorite Resource: Gender Fluidity in the Jewish Tradition 

Reason: “Gender has been non-binary throughout the course of human history, across many different cultures around the globe, and it is only a relatively recent chunk of human history that certain cultures (i.e. Western, Christian) have strictly enforced the gender binary. I can speak for my own Jewish education, but we didn’t learn about the tumtum, saris, androgynous, ay’lonit, so to learn about them and to see the rabbis discussing these people in their communities, to me, is a really great example of rediscovering some form of Queer and Trans history, and, for me, highlights how by widening the tent to non-binary genders, we are actually becoming a more authentically Jewish community.”

 

Zora Berman

Education Program Associate 

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Favorite Resource: The Gender Unicorn 

Reason: “This is something that is a really easy way for folks to visually see the difference between sex, gender, and sexuality in a really accessible way. I think this infographic can be used as a teaching tool to invite people to map themselves on spectrums they did not know existed. It is user friendly, and often very memorable for people!”

 

Essie Shachar-Hill

Education and Training Manager, Chicago

Pronouns: they/them/theirs

Favorite Resource: A Guide for the Gender Neutral B-Mitzvah

Reason: “I like it because it’s meaningful to queer Jewish ritual in ways that support and affirm who we are! It’s accessible and has best-practices all in one place, which is helpful for teens, clergy, and parents.”

 

Dubbs Weinblatt

Associate Director of Education and Training

Pronouns: they/them/theirs

Favorite Resource: “What’s in a Pronoun?” Guide

Reason: “Respecting our community members and making sure each person is seen, validated, affirmed and celebrated should be at the top of everyone’s list. One of the most important and crucial ways to accomplish this is by using someone’s correct pronouns. This guide is so comprehensive and gives context, history, and other tools for folks to start to (or continue) to affirm their community members.”

 

Emily Saltzman

LGBTQ Inclusion Specialist

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Favorite Resource: “How to Support Someone Who’s Trans and Just Came Out to You

Reason: “I think it does a great job of breaking down some of the common misconceptions of the coming out process while also giving concrete ways to be supportive of your trans buddy or family member. Another reason why I like it so much is that it also shares some of the challenging microaggressions that can show up when discussing trans identity and ways to avoid making comments that can dehumanize and cause pain for our trans friends, family and community members.”

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Valuing Debate and Conversation

Jewish tradition, informed by the precedent of the Talmud, prefers to promote discussion rather than correctness.