Passover Charoset

Haroset (Charoset)

This mixture of fruit and nuts symbolizes the mortar used by the Israelite slaves to build in Egypt.

Haroset (sometimes spelled “charoset,” or חרוסת) is a mixture of fruit and nuts for the seder plate on Passover. It’s sometimes tart, always sweet, and often chunky, frequently containing wine and cinnamon. Strangely, this sweet symbol helps us to remember the mortar that was used to make the bricks used in the building of Egyptian cities. It was back-breaking labor, all done by hand.

Find several different recipes for haroset on Passover, including Ashkenazi, Moroccan, Turkish and Egyptian variations, here!

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