Being Content With What You Have

Sometimes we simply need a reminder to be appreciative of our lives.

Commentary on Parashat Vayishlach, Genesis 32:4 - 36:43

Everyone has his or her own methods for calculating happiness. We all have different criteria that we think are important and often judge our level of comfort based on these things. While it is often easy to list all that we wish we had, sometimes it is harder to take stock of what we already have. Sometimes we simply need a reminder to be appreciative of our lives and give proper value to what we might take for granted.

This week’s Torah portion, Vayishlach, contains the story of two brothers, Jacob and Esau. At one point in the story Esau expresses to Jacob that he has enough, and Jacob should keep what is his so that he too can have enough. This seems to show a great self-awareness on Esau’s part. Not only is he content with his portion, but he wants others to recognize their bounty as well.

One of our sages asks, “Who is rich?” His answer is, “The one who appreciates what he has.” While this seems like such simple advice, in this age of plenty we still often struggle to follow it. First we have to be aware enough to recognize what we have, and only then can we be truly appreciative of it. As we become better at doing this for ourselves, we can also help others in our lives to recognize their own good fortune.

TALK TO YOUR KIDS about being appreciative for what they have.

CONNECT TO THEIR LIVES:

· What aspects of your life do you appreciate?

· How do you show your appreciation?

· What are some things that you wish were different and why?

· In what ways can you work with those feelings while still being thankful for what you have?

Reprinted with permission from Torah Topics for Today.

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