Roasted Beets with Cilantro-Basil Pesto

For your Rosh Hashanah table.

View as Single Page Single Page    Print this page Print this page
roasted-beets-hp.jpg

On Rosh Hashanah, beets, whose Aramaic name “silka” is similar to the Hebrew “salak”–go away–are eaten to express the hope that our enemies disappear.

Ingredients

  1. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  2. 1/2 cup olive oil
  3. 1/4 cup parmesan cheese (or nutritional yeast, if making pareve)
  4. 1/4 cup pine nuts*
  5. 2 cloves garlic
  6. 1 packed cup cilantro leaves, washed and dried
  7. 2 packed cups basil leaves, washed and dried
  8. 2 bunches medium-sized beets, scrubbed and ends and tops removed

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wrap individual beets in foil and use a fork to pierce a few holes into each foil-wrapped beet. Place beets on a baking sheet and roast in the oven until a knife easily pierces through the beets, about 40 minutes.

Allow beets to rest until cool to the touch, then unwrap the beets and use a paper towel rub off the skin, exposing the bright jewel-toned flesh. Slice beets into 1/4-inch circles and arrange in a bowl or on a platter. Drizzle with cilantro-basil pesto.

To Make Pesto

Place all ingredients except the olive oil into a food processor and blend until a thick paste forms. Then, with the food processor running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil, blending until smooth. Spoon over beets and store any extra pesto in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.

*Some people avoid eating nuts on the high holidays–if that is your custom, you can omit them from this recipe.

Did you like this article? MyJewishLearning is a not-for-profit organization.

Please consider making a donation today.

Leah Koenig is a writer and cookbook author whose work has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Saveur, CHOW, Food Arts, Tablet, Gastronomica, and Every Day with Rachael Ray. Leah writes a monthly food column for The Forward and a bimonthly column for Saveur.com called “One Ingredient, Many Ways.” She is the former Editor-in-Chief of the award-winning blog, The Jew & The Carrot, and she is a frequent contributor to MyJewishLearning.com, where her recipes are very popular, and highly praised. Her first cookbook, The Hadassah Everyday Cookbook: Daily Meals for the Contemporary Jewish Kitchen, was published by Rizzoli in 2011. The book was named one of the “Best Books of 2011? by Library Journal and The Kitchn called it “a big, beautiful book that is also down-to-earth and completely accessible.”

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning.com are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy