The Love/Hate of Obamacare

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A few posts ago, while the Supreme Court was still hearing arguments on the legality of the Healthcare Act, I said, “If the Supreme Court strikes-down the Health Care Act, and we have to start health care reform all over again, instead of fixing the imperfect beginnings that are already underway, I’m just going to freak out.”  So, it has passed, as a tax and not under the Inter-State Commerce Clause, but in any case, now we’ll have it- Obamacare  (properly referred to as The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act).

What does this mean to congress?  Not much.   And that’s the nature of sinat hinam, baseless hatred.  The rabbis of the Talmud said that it was for baseless hatred that the Second Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed in 70 C.E.  If the Democrats like something than you can be sure the Republicans will hate it, and vice versa.

This type of tit-for-tat bickering is not just exhausting for the country to watch, but it’s downright destructive for our society, which, before politics became so partisan and divisive, prided itself on the strength of our diversity.

Consider the classic cautionary tale about why Jerusalem was destroyed.  There was a mix up on the invitations to a party.  Two men whose names sounded awfully similar each thought that they were the rightful guest at a party.  The problem is that that hated each other, couldn’t stand each other, and nobody set them straight.  Even the sages that were present at the affair said nothing.  You can read the whole story here, but to get to the juicy part, one of the men incited the Romans against the Jews.  He told Caesar to send the Jews a goat to sacrifice at the Temple, a goat that would seem perfectly fine by Roman standards, but that the Jews would find blemished, unfit as a holy offering at the ancient Temple:

The Rabbis wanted to offer it, despite its disqualifying blemish, to preserve good relations with the authorities.

Rabbi Zekharya ben Avkolus said to them: “People will then think that blemished animals may be offered upon the altar.”

Posted on July 3, 2012
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