Jewish Food Tourney: #4 Latkes vs #5 Cholent

By far the most intriguing match up that we have seen in the tournament yet. The last match #3 Challah vs. #6 Apples & Honey was a blood bath (So much honey was spilled on the floor, the world Bee community has called it an International Week of Mourning).

Today’s will be much better though. If either of these foods ended up winning the whole tournament, I would not be surprised. They both possess all the makings of a champion: great taste; non-English names; unhealthy. Talk about a Triangle Offense.

#4 Latkes are very powerful. They are associated with the most popular Jewish holiday, Hanukkah. They are deep fried. They go well with apple sauce (Then again, what doesn’t go well with apple sauce?).

One argument against Latkes is that bad latkes exist, while bad cholent does not. I don’t buy it though. Just because you can buy store bought/frozen latkes, that does not mean fresh latkes should be punished. When I refer to “Latkes,” I’m talking about the ones that my dad almost burned down are house with, not the packaged ones.

#5 Cholent may seem like it is ranked low. But really, the #1-5 seeds are all interchangeable. To prove my point, all but the #1 seed are still in the tournament (and Matzah Ball Soup lost to Brisket, which I will discuss next week).

The key for me in Cholent is sweet potato and kishka. Not only do they taste great, but they also break apart better than regular potatoes and barley, making the cholent that much creamier.

Finally, I think it is important to note that Cholent is a good source of fiber, more than any other food in the bracket. I’m just putting that out there.

Voting will end tomorrow.

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