Tag Archives: Tent

Getting to Know (Jewish) Natchez

The TENT: The South crew

The TENT: The South crew

Last week, I was on the road with TENT, a week-long traveling seminar on culture, history, and social justice for a group of Jewish twenty-somethings. The group started in New Orleans and finished in Memphis, spending several days in Mississippi along the way.

I accompanied the group from New Orleans to Jackson, and it was a privilege to spend time with such an intelligent, enthusiastic group of young adults. All but one of them hailed from the North, so it was interesting to watch them experience Southern culture and learn about Southern Jewry from trip leader Rachel Myers and their scholar-on-the-road, Professor Eric Goldstein of Emory University.

Some in the group had been to New Orleans, but none of them had been to Natchez, Mississippi, the second stop on our tour.

Natchez, a river port town in Adams County, sits on high bluffs towering over the mighty Mississippi River. Commonly referred to as “The Bluff City,” Natchez is one of the oldest and most important European settlements in the lower Mississippi River Valley. Its economy, firmly rooted in the cotton trade, prospered during the 19th century and attracted people from around the world seeking to profit from the trade. Goods came to the area from ports in New Orleans, St. Louis, Boston, New York, and even Great Britain. As a result of this great success, in 1860 Natchez had more millionaires than anywhere else in the United States.

Though past its economic prime, Natchez continues to attract visitors with its many historic homes and festivals that celebrate life in the Old South. Here, in the so-called “most Southern place on earth,” the group quickly learned that Jews flourished in The Bluff City for over two centuries.

Natchez has thirteen National Historic Landmarks and over 1,000 structures on the National Register of Historic Places. A number of historic churches are scattered throughout the city, including Temple B’nai Israel. The original temple was built in 1870, but burned to the ground due to faulty wiring. B’nai Israel’s new building was dedicated on March 25, 1905, with over 600 people in attendance.

A number of esteemed guests come to B’nai Israel to talk to us about the history of the Natchez Jewish community. Mayor Larry Lynn “Butch” Brown [named for two other Natchez Jews of blessed memory, Larry and Lynn Abrams] spoke about the many contributions Jews made over the years, and invited us to return to the city’s tri-centennial celebration in 2016. Mimi Miller, Executive Director of the Historic Natchez Foundation, shared that the synagogue looks much as it looked in 1905. The bima, lighting fixtures, and chairs are the same. Temple member Beau Baumgardner informed us that lay-lead services are held monthly, despite the fact that the median age of temple members is 74. The congregation is fortunate to have David Goldblatt, a music professor at Alcorn State University, serve as cantorial soloist. To the group’s surprise, Beau also told us that often, more gentiles than Jews are in attendance at Shabbat services.

Jerry, with his lovely home (and lovely granddaughter!)

Jerry, with his lovely home (and lovely granddaughter!)

After visiting the temple, we met Natchez resident Jerry Krouse and toured his historic home. His adorable granddaughters helped lead the tour. Jerry has an exquisite collection of mid-eighteenth-century Rococo furniture and antiques.

Though small in numbers now, the Natchez Jewish community continues to shine in this historic gem of a city. In 1991, Temple B’nai Israel went into partnership with the ISJL (then called the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience) to ensure their temple’s preservation down the road. B’nai Israel is now listed as a Mississippi historical site. In fact, the Historic Natchez Foundation has a riddle on their architectural scavenger hunt: “I alone am surmounted by a dome, but I have few members who call me home.”

The TENT participants visiting Natchez almost all came from towns with large, thriving Jewish communities. We were all impressed by the determination of the Natchez Jewish community to keep their Jewish traditions alive for as long as possible. It was a wonderful way to begin a journey through the Jewish South, and a good lesson: a community can be small, and still be thriving.

Like this post? Get the latest in MyJewishLearning’s weekly blogs newsletter.

Posted on October 27, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

How To Prepare for a Southern Jewish Experience: Rachel’s Top 5 Picks

I’m prepping for the trip: 20 young Jews from across the country are going to meet in New Orleans
on October 19th and travel together through Mississippi and up to Memphis for a week of learning and adventure. During that time, I’ll be posting updates of our progress on Twitter and Facebook Tent Map 2013 outline6pages.

But until the TENT participants get here, I’m working hard, getting ready for their arrival – lining up speakers, prepping material, and of course, planning out where we’ll eat.

Dr. Eric Goldstein, American Jewish History professor at Emory University, will be our lead scholar, teaching two hour seminars on Southern Jewish history each day. He’s working to compile a list of academic readings for each session (I’m happy to share that list with anyone interested!) but to orient the group, many of whom have never traveled South,  I’m also gathering some of my own favorite materialsfilms, books, websitesthat explore Southern history and culture.

Curious? I thought you may be. Below are five from the list.
photo (14)
5. Delta Jews and Shalom Y’all 
Two documentaries that we will be showing on the bus, Delta Jews and Shalom Y’all. Mike DeWitt’s “Delta Jews” focuses on small, rural communities in Mississippi Delta towns. Brian Bain’s “Shalom Y’all” covers the diversity of Jewish experience throughout the American South.

bitter_paint_home4. The Bitter Southerner
The Bitter Southerner is a beautiful website publishing original, insightful stories about the South once a week. This one about Southerners taking photos in front of azaleas is my favorite.  And fair warning, this one about the Southern Foodways Alliance will make you hungry.

EyesOnThePrize
3. Eyes on the Prize (Part 5)
I had never seen Eyes on the Prize until I moved to Mississippi and started to study the events of the Civil Rights Movement. In Eyes on the Prize Part 5: Mississippi: Is this is America? 1962-1964, what blows me away is the amount of video footage that was captured during monumental events in the struggle for civil rights. I recommend going through the 14 hour documentary, but this hour in particular covers the events of the Freedom Summer in Mississippi 1964.

download
2. The Provincials 
The Provincials: A Personal History of Jews in the South, by Eli Evans, is the book that I read before beginning my own Southern Jewish experience with an internship at the ISJL seven (7!) years ago. I now recommend it to my own summer interns for a great, personal look at growing up Jewish in the South.

1. The Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities
Well, this one is obvious… but that doesn’t make it any less amazing! The ISJL’s own
Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities is the best resource for learning about the Southern Jewish experience. Our new historian, Dr. Janet Bordelon, has been hard at work updating our Mississippi entries and sharing some 21st century stories about Southern Jews.

These were my top five, but you should also check out Matzoh Ball Gumbo, ReThink Missisippi, the Southern Foodways Alliance, Garden and Gun Magazine. Clearly this is not an exhaustive lists of all the good stuff coming out of the South these days. If you have a favorite, please share! I’ve still got a few weeks to add to the list!

Like this post? Join the conversation through MyJewishLearning’s weekly blogs newsletter.

Posted on September 22, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

How To Have Your Own Southern Jewish Experience

Tent Map 2013 outline6It’s been a busy few months here in Jackson. We’ve welcomed Jewish visitors from all over the country, arranging experiences for them to discover this place I call home. This fall, I’m looking forward to a new type of tour experience that, through a partnership with The Yiddish Book Center, will bring the Southern Jewish Experience to a new group of explorers.

The TENT program is an incredible idea: a series of week-long seminars that immerse 21-30 year old Jews in full-impact experiences of culture, cuisine and community. The best thing about TENT? In addition to being fun and often profound, these programs are free to the participants.

The ISJL will host Tent: The South from October 19-26, 2014. This dynamic program will be a week-on-wheels, traveling from New Orleans to Memphis, and spending several days in Mississippi along the way. Tent: The South will explore the Jewish experience in one of this nation’s most distinctive, complicated, and fascinating regions, discovering the best that the South has to offer. Music, art, food, and visits to Jewish communities large and small will make this a week participants will never forget. (You may even start saying “Shalom, y’all.”)

It’s special for me to be involved with a project like this because as a Northern transplant to this region, I take my responsibility as a Southern advocate and promoter very seriously. (Just check out my particularly joyful expression in at :40 of this video. If that doesn’t make you want to come join me us on bus for week, I’m not sure what will.)  Tent: The South is such a great opportunity to gather people here with adventurous spirits, who are curious to experience the South.

Students from American University visiting one on my favorite Memphis spots for Southern Jewish history...Beale Street!

Students from American University visiting one on my favorite Memphis spots for Southern Jewish history…Beale Street!

I’ve put together itineraries for many groups, but this trip is especially fun because it’s built to engage my own demographic! We will get to stop (and eat!)  in some of my favorite places. Po Boys in New Orleans before visiting historic congregations. Fried chicken in Natchez before touring Antebellum mansions. Sweet tea while stopping between Civil Rights sites in Jackson. Local beers on the porch of the Shack Up Inn in Clarksdale. We’ll also be experiencing Southern arts culture. Listening to the blues while traveling between small towns like Indianola, Clarksdale, and Greenwood in the Mississippi Delta and touring the homes of William Faulkner and Eudora Welty.

For those interested in social justice work, the South is a place with a great legacy of Jewish activism. I’ve had the fortune of inviting the best scholars and experts to lead sessions– our presenters will be from amazing organizations like the William Winter Institute of Racial Reconciliation at Ole Miss in Oxford, the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University in Cleveland, and the Center for Southern Folklore in Memphis. There will be learning. There will be eating.

And dancing. There will certainly be dancing.

Sold? Great! Participants must apply to Tent: The South by August 1st, 2014. Only twenty applicants will be selected for each session. Again, Tent is offered free to accepted applicants– that means program costs, lodging, most meals, tickets, and more! Participants are responsible only for the cost of transportation, from wherever they live to New Orleans and back home again from Memphis. Space is limited, so apply now!

If you are interested and have any questions, please contact rmyers@isjl.org or 601-362-2357.

(Not eligible yourself, but know someone who is? Forward this post, share the website, spread the word!)

See you in The South!

Like this post? Join the conversation through MyJewishLearning’s weekly blogs newsletter.

Posted on July 18, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy