Find room for God? Or finding God in the room?

On Christmas morning, I’m reviewing the news online and I catch the Huffington Post’s summary of the Pope’s Christmas Eve Mass message.  In it, he bemoans the lack of space in our fast-paced lives for God:

“Do we have time and space for him? Do we not actually turn away God himself? We begin to do so when we have no time for him,” said the pope, wearing gold and white vestments.

“The faster we can move, the more efficient our time-saving appliances become, the less time we have. And God? The question of God never seems urgent. Our time is already completely full,” he said.

In the study sessions, the day-to-day conversations, the pastoral visits and other randomly occurring opportunities that I have with many people that touch on consciousness of the spiritual, I find a very different picture to the one that the Pope bemoans.  Just this past week, when one of my congregants gave the d’var torah after reading from parsha Vayigash, she took a survey of the congregation that night that highlighted this very issue.  At the moment in the Joseph story that Joseph reveals himself to his brothers in Egypt, he responds to their fear that he will seek vengeance on them.  He tells them that, while they may have meant their actions to do him harm, God meant it for good.  It appears that Joseph believes that every step of his path was intended by God in order to bring him to the position of influence that he now has, without which he would not be in a position to save his family from famine.  My congregant rejected this understanding of the unfolding of events.  But, in surveying the congregation, she found that most people believed that God does show up in the fabric of our everyday lives, but not in a manner that is engineering every step of our experience, implied by some of our biblical narratives.

And this is what I see in the conversations that I have – many questions and the search for a God that is part of the fabric of our lives, but not the God that is described in the ancient mind of the biblical authors.  Unlike the Pope, I do not see a wholesale rejection of God, or lives too busy to engage in the questions.  For sure, atheism is a very present strand of thought in our society.  But that is just one stage in the evolution of our understanding. What I see is the rejection of outdated God-ideas, but many are looking for part two –  the search for new language to replace those ideas that emerge from our actual, lived experiences.

Rabbi Irwin Kula makes precisely this argument in the video short he created, ‘Time for a New God.’  He seeks a new understanding of God and new conversations about God that can emerge from our most intensely felt life experiences.  Each and every moment is a potential doorway into something that gets us beyond a mundane interaction with our world and with each other.  For, he suggests, ‘the whole world is really just God in drag.’

Time after time, when I don’t start with the presentation of old God-ideas delivered by the philosophers of past centuries, but I start with the powerful experiences that we all have as part of life, and we then try to find language to express something of the ‘beyondness’ that the experience points toward but which we can’t quite encapsulate in words, I find common ground on which we can stand.  From there, it is possible to explore the possibilities of reclaiming the word ‘God’ to reflect what the inner reality of those experiences might be.  Or sometimes we’ll explore reclaiming the word ‘kedushah’ – holiness – as a doorway into noticing and elevating the importance of our most deeply felt experiences for directing, guiding, or informing our lives.  Whether I am having these conversations with adults, who may not have visited the God-idea since their bar or bat mitzvah, or I’m having these conversations with skeptical teenagers who feel empowered when they learn that they can claim a God-idea that jives with their experience of life, the result is often the same.  We don’t reach conclusions or serve up pat answers; but there is no lack of interest in exploring the questions.

And so, for many of us it is not a matter of finding room for God.  Rather, through the invitation to let go of old God-ideas that no longer work, in order to explore new doorways that can speak to the world we live in today, its more of a matter of finding God in the room.

 

Posted on December 26, 2012

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