Delicious Israel

I am headed to Israel today for three glorious weeks of working, traveling and what else: eating.

Last summer I was also fortunate to be in Israel for three weeks during which time I got to spend an afternoon with Inbal Baum of Delicious Israel. Inbal is American, born and raised outside of Washington, DC, who also happened to grow up with several close friends of mine. She moved to Tel Aviv five years ago and though she is a trained lawyer, she started Delicious Israel to satisfy her passion for food and travel.

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Inbal doesn’t run your typical food tours. Of course, you will taste some of the best hummus, baklava and other delicacies while walking and traveling with her. But it is Inbal herself and her approach to storytelling that made our time so unique. During our Levinsky market tour I learned about the history of Tel Aviv, how oranges played an integral role in the economic development of Israel and the different culinary influences of Greek Jews. And let me share: I loathe anything history-related, but I loved this.

Walking around the Florentin neighborhood with Inbal felt like walking around my own neighborhood, where everyone waved as we walked past. We stopped at stalls and stores on every block, tasting this, trying that, with friendly faces that greeted us everywhere.

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At one of our first stops, a small cafe and restaurant, one of the other patrons shared a plate of sausage with us and then insisted on taking shots of Arak together. I mean, who am I to say no to a shot of liquor in the middle of the afternoon with a complete stranger!? I said yes.

We sat on benches outside of Benny’s shop, simply known by its address Levinsky 41,  where he mixed us up a refreshing, artisanal soda concoction. Made with one of his homemade crab apple syrups and several other delicious (though unknown) items thrown in, it was the perfect treat on a humid Tel Aviv afternoon.

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We spent time at Yom Tov Deli where I tasted house-cured meat, homemade marinated olives and brought home feta-stuffed peppers for my husband.

But above all else it is Inbal’s storytelling that makes the deliciousness of her tours come alive. I learned so much about food, Israel and the people who make this neighborhood such a unique culinary destination.

When I knew I was headed back to Israel this summer, Inbal was one of my first phone calls. I will get a chance to spend time once again with her in the next few weeks and I can’t wait to eat and learn with her. So if you are headed to Israel, definitely check them out. Delicious Israel offers culinary walking tours, shuk and cook classes, regional winery tours and tasting and even Shabbat dinners. Not to mention the amazing cast of characters you will get to meet wherever she takes you.

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Inbal Baum can be reached to arrange tours through her website, Delicious Israel

Posted on June 26, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Strawberry Lemonade Greek Yogurt Pops

Yield:
8-10 popsicles

After living in New York City for nearly nine years I rarely sigh and complain with the refrain “only in New York.” Most of the time the hustle and bustle of NYC is music to my ears. And many days I walk down the street in awe of this city, it’s rhythm, energy and totally unique personality. But last summer, I had one of those “only in New York” experiences.

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I was walking to pick up my little one from daycare when two adorable siblings caught my attention with their home-made lemonade stand. These kids were excellent salespeople, and since I cannot resist homemade lemonade, I opted for a cup (for more than a dollar, hello New York!) and asked the kids what they were doing with the money. In my day, we either donated the money to charity, or bought a fun, new beach toy. Not these kids. They were on the fast track to Harvard. Filled with pride, the precocious 10 year old told me she is planning to donate her portion to pediatric cancer research (amen, sister) and her younger brother (all of six or seven years old) was saving up for his college education. Good for them. A combined age of 17 and these kids were doing it right. They had created a complete brand for their lemonade sale, were strategically placed, and not afraid to tout their business and fundraising plan. Well played, kids, well played. Alas, only in New York is lemonade more than a dollar, and a literal investment in a child’s future.

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These popsicles are a hybrid of my childhood memories, and also my NYC surroundings. They are sweet, tart, refreshing and just a touch more sophisticated than your average popsicle.

If you have leftovers (which I did) try filling the ice cube tray and popping it in the freezer. This way, you have tiny little treats whenever you want – they’re the perfect size for toddlers, and a delicious addition to your morning cup of orange juice.

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Strawberry Lemonade Greek Yogurt Pops

Ingredients

For the strawberry sauce:

1 bag frozen strawberries, thawed completely

¼ cup sugar

¼ tsp vanilla bean paste or extract

 

For the lemon sauce:

Zest of 2 lemons

½ cup lemon juice (2 large lemons or 4 small lemons)

2 Tbsp sugar

 

For the Greek yogurt mixture:

2 cups of 2% (or higher) plain Greek yogurt

¼ cup sugar

Special equipment: popsicle molds

Directions

To make the strawberry sauce:

Pour a bag of thawed strawberries into a soup pot. Add the sugar and cook on high for approximately 5 minutes until the mixture is bubbling. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for another 10-15 minutes until the mixture has thickened and reduced. Stir occasionally and mash up the berries. Let cool.

To make the lemon sauce:

Wash the lemons. Zest two of the lemons and set the zest aside. Next, juice 2-4 lemons, to yield ½ cup of lemon juice. Pour the lemon juice in a sauce pan, add the sugar, and bring to a boil. Let the juice continue to heat on low for another minute. Set aside.

To make the Greek yogurt base:

Pour 2 cups of yogurt into a bowl. Stir in ¼ cup sugar. Add the lemon juice and stir thoroughly. Next, fold in the lemon zest until completely mixed.

To assemble the popsicles put approximately 1 Tbsp of strawberry sauce at the bottom of the popsicle mold. Top with 2-3 Tbsp yogurt. Continue layering until you fill the popsicle mold.

Fill all the molds until you finish the yogurt and strawberry sauce. Freeze overnight. To enjoy, run the popsicle mold under hot water for 10 seconds and gently pull the popsicle handle until it releases from the mold. 

Posted on June 24, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Soom Foods Chocolate Sesame Spread

Yield:
1 shake

I love all things that involve chocolate, sesame or taste like halva. Nevertheless I was skeptical when Soom Foods wanted to send me a jar of their Chocolate Sesame Butter. I have nutella already, and I like it just fine. But try it I did. And so did my two year old. Let me say: I am totally in love. It is rich, a little salty and I like to pretend its super healthful since sesame is supposedly so good for you.

I didn’t have a chance yet to bake it into anything yummy, but I am sure it would go great inside rugelach or make a fabulous frosting on cake. I did have time to try it out in a post-workout smoothie and it was divine. The result was a chocolatey, slightly savory smoothie that really satisfied my craving for a milk shake.

soom-foods-smoothieBut perhaps our favorite way to eat it was right out of the jar on slices of apple or mini pretzels as an afternoon snack.

And now through June 30th Soom Foods is running a “From the Jar” contest to feature their fans’ photos eating the chocolate sesame spread straight from the jar. You can enter on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter by using the hashtag #fromthejar with a photo of yourself or someone you love eating Soom Chocolate Sesame Butter straight from the jar.  So go ahead, get messy and have fun with those pics.

You can also check out Soom Foods’ full line of products and order straight from Amazon.

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Chocolate Sesame Banana Smoothie

Ingredients

1 cup ice

1-2 Tbsp Soom Foods chocolate sesame spread

1/2 banana

1/2 cup lowfat milk

1 scoop chocolate protein powder (optional)

Directions

Place all ingredients in a blender. Pulse until desired smoothness.

Serve cold with a straw.

Posted on June 23, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Gluten-Free Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

I try to eat a pretty healthy and mostly unprocessed gluten-free diet, but I do love mac & cheese. This is my new favorite way to make it—a healthier cheese sauce that uses pureed butternut squash and milk as the base with just a bit of shredded cheese, topped off with cheese and buttered breadcrumbs, and baked in the oven until it’s bubbly inside and toasty on top. This is also a great way to get picky kids to eat vegetables—the sauce tastes cheesy, not squashy! For an extra bit of richness, use whole milk instead of 2%.

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Gluten-Free Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

Ingredients

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 large onion, diced

3 garlic cloves, minced

2 cups cooked butternut squash

1 ¼ cup 2 % milk

½ tsp sea salt + more to taste

1/8 tsp black pepper

1 lb gluten-free pasta (macaroni, penne, ziti, or rigatoni are best)

1½ cups shredded mozzarella, divided

1/3 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs

2 Tbsp melted butter

Finely minced herbs for garnish

Directions

Grease a 9x13 inch baking pan or a 10-inch cast iron skillet. Place a large pot of salted water to boil and preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Heat a skillet over a medium flame. Add olive oil, onion, and garlic and sauté 6-8 minutes until the onions are soft. Remove from heat and add squash, 1 cup of milk, ½ tsp salt, and pepper. Using an immersion blender, blend squash mixture until smooth. If you don't have an immersion blender you can use a food processor or blender and puree in batches.

Add additional ¼ cup of milk as necessary, you want a thick sauce but you don’t want it too chunky. Stir in 1 cup mozzarella and additional salt and pepper to taste.

Once the water is boiling, cook pasta until very al dente (3-4 minutes less than you would normally cook it, this will help prevent the pasta from becoming mushy as it cooks longer in the oven). Drain pasta and return to pot. Add squash sauce and stir until all of the pasta is evenly coated. Pour into prepared baking dish.

Stir bread crumbs into melted butter. Top pasta with remaining mozzarella and buttered bread crumbs. Bake at 375 for 30-40 minutes until the cheese and breadcrumbs are toasty and the edges of the pasta are browned.

Top with your favorite fresh herbs such as basil or parsley.

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Posted on June 18, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Blogger Spotlight: Chosen Bites

Anyone who knows me (or reads this blog) knows I am not the biggest supporter of the gluten-free fad. In fact, I am actively and vocally pro-gluten. Not that I am insensitive towards those with special dietary needs, which is why I chatted recently with Rella Kaplowitz from Chosen Bites to better understand why and how one adjusts to such a diet.  Rella’s creations always look delicious, even despite the lack of gluten. So stay tuned for her gluten-free butternut squash mac ‘n cheese!

Rella head shotOk Rella: talk to me about gluten-free food, diet, and why you chose to jump on the bandwagon.

The short answer is, although I tested negative for celiac disease, gluten makes me really sick. I’ve had stomach problems my whole life, and up until about 5 years ago I figured it was just a way of life. Then a friend of mine mentioned trying a gluten-free diet, and within 6 months I was living “intestinal distress” free! I had also been severely lactose intolerant (like having to take 6 Lactaid pills to eat a scoop of ice cream intolerant) since I was about 15, and about 2 years after being gluten-free I was able to introduce dairy back into my diet. I’ve been eating loads of dairy ever since to make up for lost time.

 What do you think about the fact that gluten-free is now sort of trendy?

There are pros and cons to the gluten-free fad. On one hand, being gluten-free is so much easier now than it was 5 years ago. The market is inundated with gluten-free products, restaurants are catering to gluten-free diets. On the other hand, many people fail to understand the difference between people who are gluten-free by necessity (i.e. gluten makes them severely ill) and people who are gluten-free because it’s a lifestyle choice. When I ingest gluten, I can feel the aftereffects for a few hours or several days depending on how much gets into my system. It’s not a joke—but some people think being gluten-intolerant is fake and aren’t as careful as they should be (like restaurants who serve gluten-free pasta but boil it in the same water as gluten-full pasta).

Is there something you have tried to make gluten-free but just didn’t work?

I can’t seem to recreate a real, NY-style bagel that’s gluten-free. There is something about the crispy outside, chewy inside that just isn’t replicable. Which is very sad considering that is the ONE thing I truly miss since cutting gluten out of my diet. I did make a great pretzel roll recipe. And while it’s not a bagel, I love this coconut blueberry granola recipe as a satisfying breakfast.

coconut blueberry granola

Do you have resources you would recommend to others keeping a gluten-free diet?

There are so many good resources for people who maintain a gluten-free diet.

  • The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness has a wealth of information about celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and a gluten-free resource directory with tons of products and services to help support a gluten-free diet.
  • Gluten-Free Goddess is very kosher friendly since most of the recipes are vegan or vegetarian in addition to being gluten-free.
  • Gluten-Free Girl is an excellent resource for gluten-free baking.
  • Gluten-free products can be expensive, so I order all of mine online (especially gluten-free flours) mostly through Vitacost. Most grocery stores will have what you need but it could cost as much as 50% more.

The one thing I will add is beware of websites offering medical advice. There is a lot of bad advice out there, and you should ALWAYS consult with a doctor before doing anything that might have a health impact.

What’s the best thing to happen as a result of baking and blogging for you?

I love being in the kitchen—at the end of a long day, I find it cathartic to pull out a bunch of ingredients and create something delicious. People laugh when I tell them I de-stress after work by making dinner or baking a batch of cookies, but it’s true! And once I started blogging, it allowed me to share my gift of cooking and baking with others. There is also an unbelievably warm community of food bloggers, especially food allergy focused bloggers.

So…you sell gluten-free, kosher baked goods. What kinds of products do you offer?

You can see everything I offer on my website. I can customize most of my items—they aren’t just gluten-free, they can also be free of other allergens like dairy, soy, corn, tree nuts, and peanuts. Right now I’m primarily selling in the DC area, although I ship orders pretty regularly too.

ginger snap cookie

What’s next on the horizon for Rella and Chosen Bites?

I would love to grow Chosen Bites in to a bigger business selling delicious baked goods that make people forget they have food allergies. However, it’s still a hobby right now—I have a day job that takes up a lot of my time too! So I guess the answer is, I don’t know what’s on the horizon but I’m certainly open to riding things out to see where they lead.

Posted on June 17, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Egg Cream Float

Yield:
1 egg cream

A fond memory of my childhood is the New York-style egg creams my dad would whip up for me on Sundays during lunch. Sundays were the most relaxed day of the week in our home and I suppose a home-made egg cream was a sign we could all enjoy ourselves just a tad a more.

Egg creams are light, refreshing but still somehow a little rich. Chocolatey. Sweet. And according to my dad (and many other egg cream aficionados) MUST be made with Fox’s U-Bet chocolate syrup. My dad also taught me that the ratio of milk to chocolate syrup is very important for a good egg cream.

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I had been thinking recently that adding a scoop of ice cream to an egg cream would be a great way to really take it to the next level. But why stop with ice cream? You could also add a shot of Baileys or Kahlua to make a more “adult” version.

Want to make it non-dairy? Use vanilla almond milk, or leave out the milk all together and add a scoop of your favorite non-dairy ice cream.

But my favorite touch to this updated egg cream was the colorful sprinkles. An extra touch of whimsy had me traveling back to the Sunday lunches of my childhood.

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Egg Cream Float

Ingredients

2 Tbsp U-Bet chocolate syrup

2 Tbsp milk

1 cup seltzer

1 scoop vanilla ice cream

Whipped cream (optional)

Sprinkles (optional)

Directions

Pour chocolate syrup into tall glass. Add milk on top.

Then add seltzer. Make sure seltzer does not reach top of glass or it will spill over. Using a spoon, stir chocolate syrup, milk and seltzer vigorously. It will be foamy on top.

Add scoop of ice cream, whipped cream and sprinkles if desired. Enjoy with straw.

Posted on June 12, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Pineapple Coconut Coffee Cake

Yield:
8-10 servings

Like so many of my peers, Jewish summer camp played an integral role in my Jewish identity. It’s where I developed my appreciation for Israeli dancing, a deep respect for my surroundings in nature, and not to be outdone, my love of Shabbat breakfast. Every Saturday morning, before all the campers joined for services, we’d convene in the dining hall for a plentiful feast of crumbly and perfectly spiced coffee cake. It wasn’t elaborate, but it sure was special, and it was certainly on the list of things I looked forward to year after year as I awaited summer’s arrival. If I ever longed for a little taste of home while I was at camp, I just had to wait until the end of the week, since the combination of cinnamon and sugar in the crumb topping would remind anyone of home. Because of this experience and because it only gets better the day after it is baked, to me, coffee cake is synonymous with Shabbat morning, summer vacation or not.

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Of course, as an adult, summer camp is no longer really in the cards for me anymore. These days, when we get through hiking the trails of all the nearby national forests, my husband and I long for a more tropical getaway. Since our next vacation seems light years away, I came up with a recipe inspired by my Cuban heritage that will be sure to satisfy until we can get ourselves to the nearest island.

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With its taste of the tropics, my Pineapple Coconut Coffee Cake hits the spot for a Shabbat morning treat. It has the cinnamon and sugar that I always remember from my camp days, but its layer of crushed pineapple adds a mild zing and just the touch needed to keep this cake moist for days. The coconut added to the crumb layer, suggested by my friend Dolly, acts as a tropical kiss and adds a nice crunch.

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Next time you’re in the mood for a reminder of Shabbat mornings at camp, or you’re longing for a quick getaway, try a bite of this coffee cake, and you won’t be disappointed.

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Pineapple Coconut Coffee Cake

Ingredients

For the cake batter:

2 cups all-purpose OR cake flour

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp table salt (not kosher salt)

½ cup unsalted butter, softened

½ cup granulated sugar

½ cup brown sugar

3 eggs

1 cup sour cream

1½ tsp pure vanilla extract

1 20 oz can of crushed pineapple, well-drained, and juice reserved

For the crumb topping

¼ cup granulated sugar

¼ cup brown sugar

½ cup grated coconut

½ cup all-purpose flour

¾ tsp ground cinnamon

⅛ tsp salt

¼ tsp nutmeg

¼ cup unsalted butter, softened

For the glaze:

3 oz cream cheese, softened

⅔ cup confectioners' sugar

3-4 Tbsp. of the reserved pineapple juice

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-inch tube pan, and line with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

In a separate bowl, cream together the butter and the sugar. Add the eggs, one by one, and mix well. Stir in the sour cream and vanilla extract.

Combine the dry mixture into the wet mixture in three batches, and mix only until incorporated, and set aside.

Meanwhile, combine all the ingredients of the crumb topping, and cut in the butter using a fork or a pastry cutter. Set aside.

In your greased tube pan, spoon in half of the batter, and use the back of the spoon to even the layer. Sprinkle on half of the crumb topping in an even layer. Spoon the drained pineapple over the crumb layer. Top with second half of cake batter, and spread to even the layer. Add the remaining crumb topping, and bake for 45-50 minutes.

Once the cake is golden brown, remove from oven, and cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes. After the initial 10-minute cooling time, remove the cake from the pan, and cool the rest of the way.

Once cooled, glaze the cake by whisking together all the glaze ingredients, and using the prongs of a fork to drizzle over the cake. Let the glaze set before slicing.

Posted on June 10, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Foodie Gift Ideas for Dad

When Father’s Day was just about buying my dad something and a card, well, that was a piece of cake. Well, actually it was usually a pair of new socks.

But now that I am married with a child, Father’s Day takes on a whole new meaning. And let me just say—my husband is really not the easiest person to shop for. In fact I really rack my brain each year to get him something he will love, something that is meaningful and something he doesn’t already have.

But your search for the perfect gift shouldn’t be as trying as mine. So with the help of some other daddy food bloggers, I have put together a list of some Father’s Day suggestions for the foodie dad in your life. Got other ideas? Don’t forget to post below!

Grilling  and grilling accessories is an obvious choice, says Yosef Silver of This American Bite. So he suggests the Big Green Egg Grill. You can also pick up the corresponding Big Green Egg Cookbook.

Dani Klein of YeahThatsKosher.com suggests a night out to a great steak place, and he even compiled a list of New York-area steak places. I know my husband enjoys a good night out with steak and scotch, so I that was also a great idea too.

scotch collage

For the Whiskey Lover

Scotchy Scotch Glasses

Scotch rocks

coffee collage

For the Caffeine Addict

French Press Travel Mug

Milk Frother

Coffee and Spice Grinder

Cold Brew Coffee Set

deli collage

For the Deli Lover

Indoor/Outdoor Stovetop Smoker

I Luv Pastrami Mug

The Mile-End Cookbook

beer glasses

For the Beer Lover

Home-Brewing Set

Beer Glass Sampler

fun gifts collage

Other Fun Gift Ideas

NYC Travel Mug

Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food

Mensch Mug

Best. Dad. Ever. Apron

 

Posted on June 9, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shavuot Menu Ideas (Blintzes, Cheesecake, Ziti – Oh My!)

June is a tricky time for a holiday like Shavuot. On one hand, I love having an excuse to make dairy-centric meals. But on the other hand, I don’t want to eat heavy, cheese-laden food this time of year. As we approach Shavuot I have put together some of recipe ideas that include some lighter fair perfect for outdoor eating and warmer weather. Hope this inspires you! Tell us what you’re making below, and submit any questions if you’re looking for input or advice.

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To start:

Wedge Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing & Challah Croutons

Labne Watermelon Corn Salsa Spinach, Blueberry & Goat Cheese Salad

Chickpea Arugula Salad with Tahini Dressing

Cucumber Avocado Soup

Creamy Roasted Beet Soup

tomatoes 2

For the main event:

Cauliflower Tomato Bake with Basil & Parmesan

Grilled Eggplant Mozzarella Stacks

Green Lasagna

Classic Blintzes or Gluten-free Blintzes

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Strawberry Rhubarb Blintzes

Baked Salmon with Caramelized Onions

Baked Ziti Cupcakes

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And for cheesecake…

Classic Cheesecake

Lavender Cheesecake

Black and White Cookie Cheesecake

Strawberry Rhubarb Cheesecake

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Posted on June 2, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Strawberry Rhubarb Cheesecake

Yield:
8-10 servings

When I look at rhubarb, it reminds me of some sort of alien plant. It’s not really appealing, and yet it is so coveted for spring cooking. I will admit: it does some wonderful things when cooked despite its unusual appearance.

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Others may say that this simple vegetable has genius qualities and a beautiful color. Which is does of course. On its own it can be bitter, but when paired with fruit, especially springtime strawberries, it balances perfectly in many combinations.

Since rhubarb has been in abundance at my local farmer’s market, and because I love trying new things, I decided it was high time I conquered my apprehension around rhubarb. Also my husband loves it, so it’s an easy way to shut him up for a bit.

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Shavuot…rhubarb abundance…it was clear a strawberry rhubarb topped cheesecake was only natural for this time of year.

Some of my other favorite strawberry rhubarb recipes to highlight?

Strawberry Rhubarb Blintzes from Leah Koenig

Strawberry Rhubarb Crumble Ice Cream from Naomi Sugar

Rhubarb Rugelach from Tamar Fox

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Strawberry Rhubarb Cheesecake

Ingredients

For the topping:

2 cups rhubarb, sliced

1 cup strawberries, sliced

2 Tbsp orange juice

¼ cup water

1 Tbsp cornstarch

For the crust:

10 whole graham crackers

¼ cup melted butter

1 tsp sugar

¼ tsp sea salt

For the filling:

3 8 ounce packages of full fat cream cheese

2 cups sour cream

3 eggs, lightly beaten

1 cup sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2 tsp fresh lemon zest

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a food processor fitted with the blade attachment, pulse graham crackers, sugar, salt and melted butter until crumbs form.

Press crumbs into bottom of springform pan. Bake for 7-9 minutes. Allows to cool completely.

In a large bowl beat cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Add sour cream, vanilla and lemon zest. Mix in eggs.

Pour cream cheese mixture into prepared graham cracker crust. Bake for 50-60 minutes or until middle is just set but jiggles slightly. Allow to cool on a wire rack and then chill in the fridge for several hours or overnight.

To make the topping, place rhubarb, strawberries and orange juice in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook 7-10 minutes, until the strawberries and rhubarb start breaking down. Combine corn starch and water and add to rhubarb-strawberry mixture. Continue cooking another 5-7 minutes until mixture is thick and strawberries and rhubarb are completely broken down and soft. Remove from heat and allow to cool.

After the cheesecake and topping have both cooled, spoon strawberry-rhubarb mixture on top of cheesecake. Serve chilled.

Posted on May 30, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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