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The Ten Greatest Books in Jewish History

Hosted By: Orange County Community Scholar Program (CSP)

We will NOT discuss the most critically acclaimed books, nor the best selling Jewish books, but rather the 10 Jewish books (not including the Five Books of Moses) that have had the greatest influence on the Jewish people. We will explore the importance of each book and discuss some samples from each one. Finally, we will make some predications about some contemporary books that may become classics.

3:30 ET/12:30 PT

The event listed here is hosted by a third party. My Jewish Learning/70 Faces Media is not responsible for its content or for errors in the listing.

Teacher

Arthur Kurzweil

Arthur Kurzweil is the author of The Encyclopedia of Jewish Genealogy as well as My Generations: A Course in Jewish Family History. My Generations is a popular textbook that has been used for almost twenty years in many synagogue schools throughout the United States and Canada. Arthur has had a lifelong passion for books. Trained as a professional librarian, editor-in-chief of the Jewish Book Club for 17 years, past president of the Jewish Book Council, Judaica acquisitions editor and literary agent, Arthur Kurzweil came to a personal conclusion that the ultimate book for him is the one often described as the cornerstone of Jewish culture, the Talmud. Arthur Kurzweil is the recipient of the Distinguished Humanitarian Award from the Melton Center of Ohio State University for his unique contributions to the field of Jewish education. 
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