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Sharing the Story: The Descendants of the Crypto-Jews

Hosted By: New Mexico Jewish Historical Society

Co-recipients of the New Mexico Jewish Historical Society 2021 Hurst Award, Isabelle Sandoval and Norma Libman will present a program addressing issues surrounding the Crypto-Jewish community today.

Norma Libman will talk about her 25 years of learning and teaching about the Crypto-Jewish/Converso experience: how the response to the story has evolved and how her presentations have been received in various areas of our country.

Isabelle Sandoval, grounded in her New Mexico ancestry and experience, will voice her perception of key groups/persons, the impact of the internet/social media, listening to the voice of descendants of Crypto-Jews, and confronting pandemic and Portuguese/Spanish citizenship challenges.

The event listed here is hosted by a third party. My Jewish Learning/70 Faces Media is not responsible for its content or for errors in the listing.

Host

New Mexico Jewish Historical Society

Established in 1985, the New Mexico Jewish Historical Society’s (NMJHS) mission is to tell and share the stories of the many Jewish groups that came and stayed and helped shape New Mexico, the unique place that is in the American Southwest. The Society sponsors ongoing research, presents lectures, holds conferences, shows films, maintains archives, sells publications about the history of pioneer Jewish families, and publishes an award-winning quarterly newsletter, Legacy.
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