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Our Women Are All Important (For Teenage Girls)

Hosted By: Drisha

A series for teenage girls, by registration only. These classes will not be recorded or livestreamed.

The Tosfot declared: “the women of our day are all important,” thereby requiring all women to participate as relaxed, leaning royalty in the seder night. In Purim and Passover we see a number of instances where important women are named as the cause for exceptions or changes to Halakhic rules. Join to learn about women’s obligation in Megillat Esther, the seder night’s four cups of wine and the seder night’s obligation in leaning.

The event listed here is hosted by a third party. My Jewish Learning/70 Faces Media is not responsible for its content or for errors in the listing.

Teacher

Rabbanit Leah Sarna

Rabbanit Leah Sarna is the Associate Director of Education and Director of High School Programs at Drisha. She previously served as Director of Religious Engagement at Anshe Sholom B’nai Israel Congregation in Chicago, a leading urban Orthodox congregation. She was ordained at Yeshivat Maharat in 2018, holds a BA from Yale University in Philosophy & Psychology, and also trained at the SKA Beit Midrash for Women at Migdal Oz, Drisha and the Center for Modern Torah Leadership. Rabbanit Sarna's published works have appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Lehrhaus and MyJewishLearning. She has lectured in Orthodox synagogues and Jewish communal settings around the world and loves spreading her warm, energetic love for Torah and Mitzvot with Jews in all stages of life.
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Host

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Drisha

Drisha offers a wide range of learning programs steeped in Jewish text and advances a model of learning that is engaged, committed, and open.
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