Prep Cook Serves Ready In
10 minutes 40 minutes 8-10 50 minutes

Blintz Souffle

A traditional recipe for breaking the fast.

I am a strong advocate of breaking a fast (like Tisha B’Av or Yom Kippur) with breakfast food. Specifically, bagels, cream cheese, lox and blintz souffle. Also orange juice, coffee and a big green salad. It feels odd to dig into these brunch classics at 9 or 10 at night, but it’s always incredibly satisfying to eat breakfast as the first meal of the day, even if that meal doesn’t come until after dark.

The best thing about this recipe is that you really can throw it together in the first 10 minutes after the fast ends. Stick it in the oven, serve the bagels first, and it will be ready to go when people are ready for something sweet. You can also make it ahead of time and just reheat it — this is not a dish that suffers from reheating, so don’t worry (though it may look slightly less puffy the second time it comes out of the oven).

You can use any kind of frozen blintzes, but I am a purist and like to be sure that at least half are cheese.

Ingredients

Sprinkle of cinnamon

6 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 cup orange juice

1/2 cup sugar or honey

1 1/2 pts sour cream (feel free to use reduced fat, but avoid the fat-free slime)

1/2 cup margarine or butter

2 packages frozen blintzes

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350F. Melt the butter or margarine and pour into a 9×13 baking pan. Place the frozen blintzes in the pan and turn them to ensure they all get coated in butter or margarine. If you’re using two (or more) different kinds of blintzes, make sure you know which side of the pan has which kind of blintz. In a bowl beat together sour cream, eggs, vanilla, orange juice, and sugar or honey. Pour the sour cream mixture over the blintzes and sprinkle the top with cinnamon. Bake for 40 minutes or until the top is puffy and golden.

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