Challah with a Chinese Twist

There’s a not-so-funny joke that goes, “A man walks into a Chinese restaurant and says to the waiter, ‘Excuse me sir, but are there any Chinese Jews?’ To which the waiter replies, ‘No, sir, we just have orange juice, apple juice, grapefruit juice…'”

It’s slightly bearable if the delivery includes an awful impression of a Chinese accent. But there are apparently many people who do appreciate this joke, and they make sure that it makes its way through the grapevine to me, a Chinese Jew.

I enjoy being a Chinese Jew.

I eat plenty of matzo balls and potstickers, I celebrate three New Years, and in high school I crushed my math classes.

I’ve often had to convince people that I’m Jewish, which is amusing and usually results in a new friend feeling like they can connect with me better due to a shared religion. Other than that, I can’t say I really thought about what it meant to Chinese and Jewish while I was growing up.

The only time my Chinese Jewishness got me into trouble was during my dating days in New York. Jewish guys with “yellow fever” would take me on casual dates to casual places, but the second they discovered I was Jewish, things got weird. Suddenly I wasn’t a casual date, suddenly I was the first Jewish girl that didn’t remind them of their mother and do I want to get married.

scallion-challah-doughSpeaking of boys.

I recently followed a Norwegian one out to rural North Dakota, population six Jews and about 10,000 Scandinavian descendants. Things are quiet here, people are Midwestern nice, and the small town life is pretty darn wonderful.

For the first time in my life, I feel a bit like an oddball, in a sea of light-haired Lutherans, but people embrace me when I introduce them to challah. North Dakotans love challah! And I love their food too, like Lefse and dessert bars of all sorts.

braided-scallionAll of my Challah here is homemade. As are my latkes, kugel, matzo balls… you get the picture. There’s not a deli in sight. Not even a bagel. I do miss bopping down to Zabar’s for babka and bagels, but on the other hand, with the necessity to make everything from scratch comes the opportunity to put my own spin on things and mash up my Chinese/Jewish/Midwesternness.

Brisket in my potstickers, ginger sugar beet latkes, egg rolls with home cured pastrami from a cow that I’ll one day raise…

I’m getting carried away.


Here is an Asian twist on my all time favorite challah. It’s inspired by the scallion pancake.

scallion-challah-cutAsian Challah

Makes one large loaf

Basic Challah Dough

Based on Food 52’s Recipe

1 tablespoon instant yeast

3/4 cups warm water

2 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon sugar

3 cups flour, plus more for dusting

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons honey

1/3 cups vegetable or canola oil

2 eggs

Filling and Topping

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

2-3 stalks scallions or green onions, minced

salt, pepper, and red chili flakes to taste

Egg wash: 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water

A few pinches of toasted sesame seeds and black sesame seeds

Directions

In a small bowl, proof yeast in 1/2 cup warm water mixed with 1 teaspoon of sugar.

While yeast is proofing, mix flour, salt, and remaining 2 tablespoons of sugar in a large bowl.

In a medium bowl, mix remaining 1/4 cup of water, honey, oil, and eggs.

Once yeast has finished proofing, add it to the flour, followed by the wet ingredients. Mix with a large wooden spoon until dough becomes too thick to stir. Empty dough onto well-floured surface and knead by hand. Knead dough until smooth and no longer sticky, adding flour as needed.

Transfer to an oiled bowl and cover with a damp towel. Let rise for about two hours, or until doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 375.

Divide dough into three equal parts and then roll each part into a 1-foot log. Gently flatten each log so that it is about 3 inches wide.

Brush each with toasted sesame oil and then sprinkle with salt, pepper, chili flakes, and scallions. Roll them up length wise like a jellyroll, and then braid.

Place the loaf on a parchment lined baking sheet and then brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds and black pepper.

Bake for 20-25 minutes until the top is golden brown and the challah is cooked through.

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