How to Find an Online Passover Seder

In this time of social distancing, many Jewish institutions are offering online options for the Passover seder. Here's a guide.

The coronavirus pandemic has scuttled plans for large traditional gatherings this Passover, but there’s no shortage of online alternatives. Many synagogues and other Jewish institutions are planning to hold virtual seders this year on Zoom or other platforms. Often these are limited to synagogue members, but not always. Below is a list of online Passover seders that anyone can join.

92nd Street Y: The venerable Manhattan cultural institution is offering a free seder on Zoom for the second night of Passover, Thursday April 9 at 7:30 PM Eastern. More information and registration here. The Y is also offering a family seder on Facebook on Wednesday morning at 10:30 AM Eastern.

Seder 2020 by OneTable: OneTable normally pairs up hosts and guests for Shabbat meals. This year, it’s doing it for Passover. Want to host a virtual seder? Want to attend one? Click here for details.

Lab/Shul: Want to join a seder with Ester Perel and David Broza? Now’s your chance. Join them and other notables Thursday at 7:00 PM Eastern. Details and registration here.

Orlando Jewish Federation: Passover trips to Florida didn’t happen this year, but here’s a chance to get there virtually by joining the Orlando Jewish Federation’s free Zoom Passover seder Wednesday night at 6:30 PM Eastern. Details and registration here.

Beyt Tikkun: It’s particularly hard to feel free this Passover, but Beyt Tikkun in California’s liberation seder might do the trick. Join them on Zoom Thursday night at 6:00 PM Pacific time. Details and registration here.

The Jewish Center: Broadcasting a seder online poses some challenges for those who avoid electronics on Jewish holidays. The Jewish Center has a creative workaround: Their virtual seder will be broadcast on Wednesday from the West Coast before the holiday begins. Watch it on Zoom Wednesday night at 7:00 PM Eastern.

Russ and Daughters: Yes, you read that right. The classic Lower East Side smoked salmon emporium is hosting a Zoom seder Thursday night. It costs $20 a head to participate, with proceeds going to help store employees out of work due to the coronavirus. Plus side: Elvis Costello is going to be there! Details and registration here.

JCC of Manhattan: The Upper West Side institution has three online seders in the works this year: A free seder for families and kids (Wednesday at 4:30 PM Eastern — details here); a queer seder (Thursday at 7:00 PM Eastern — details here); and an Israel-themed seder (Thursday night at 8:30 PM Eastern — details here).

Ikkar: Join the Los Angeles congregation’s Hillel Tigay for a musical seder Thursday at 7:00 PM Pacific time. Register here.

The Kitchen: This San Francisco-based “religious start up” will be hosting a community-wide Zoom seder on Thursday at 6:30 PM Pacific Time. Details and registration here.

Quarantine Seder: This global online seder is being held on both the first and second nights of Passover via WhatsApp, with proceeds benefiting World Central Kitchen. Details and registration here.

Did we miss something? Let us know at community@myjewishlearning.com.

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