Twelve Minor Prophets

Isaiah 40-66: Return and Restoration

In Isaiah 40-66, the prophet(s) built on the theological paradigms of Isaiah ben Amoz (Isaiah 1-39).

Hosea & Amos: Prophets to the North

Hosea and Amos share prophetic concern for a nation in turmoil.

Zephaniah, Nahum, Habakk

They struggled to reconcile the words of earlier prophets.

Isaiah ben Amoz: Political Prophet (Isaiah: 1-39)

Isaiah's greatness lies not only in his ethical teachings, but in his central involvement--and prophetic intervention--in the political events of his day.

Joel: Misplaced Prophet of the Locust Plague

Joel vividly portrays the dependence of human life upon God's favor.

Isaiah 3:1-15 A Commentary

Isaiah decries injustice by the elite against the poor. As a fit punishment, social order will be upset, leaving the people in leaderless chaos.

Jeremiah 7:  The Israelites’ "Edifice Complex"

The prophet takes on the people's mistaken assumption that they can safely persist in unethical behavior--and that God would never destroy the Temple.

Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi: Back in the Land

These three prophets are principally concerned with the status of the Temple, the new religious hierarchy, and the religious obligations of the post-exilic community.

Ezekiel

The controversial Book of Ezekiel nearly didn't make it into the biblical canon, but it has had a lasting impact on both liturgical practice and mystical traditions.

Jonah’s Lesson in Divine Mercy

Scholars have long disagreed on the central message of the Book of Jonah.