Recipes: Comforting Classics for your Camper

As the camp season comes to a close, your camper is returning home with hundreds of amazing memories, an expanded sense of self, a deeper appreciation of Judaism and lots of smelly clothes.  Although he likely had an incredible time, he has probably had enough of camp food and is counting the minutes until his first home cooked meal.  August seems like an odd time to be discussing comfort food, but when you have a child who has seen too much peanut butter and jelly, frozen fish sticks and questionable spaghetti and meatballs it makes sense to be thinking of making your old, homey classics.

Comfort food is aptly named because of its ability to bring us a sense of calm, happiness and nostalgia.  Often, however, comfort food is laden with unnecessary calories and is devoid of vegetables, whole grains or other foods that are comforting to our bodies rather than our souls.  If we really want to bring ourselves and our children a full sense of comfort after a summer of bug bites, bug juice and stomach bugs we should meld soul-warming comfort classics with some new, healthy tips and tricks.

Try these “cleaned up” comfort classics to enjoy as a family.  Over the meal you can find out what your camper learned about Judaism over the summer and you can share with her the Jewish reason for eating healthy: Shmirat HaGuf, or guarding one’s body because it came from God.

Crispy, Flavorful “Fried” Chicken
Serves 6

1 8-piece chicken cut up chicken, skin removed
2 cups all purpose flour
½ teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon fresh cracked black pepper
2 eggs, lightly beaten
¼ cup Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 cup quick cooking oats
1 ½ cups crushed cornflakes
1 cup crushed whole-wheat crackers
1 teaspoon smoked or hot paprika

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and spray a 9 x 13 pan with cooking spray.
  2. On a large plate combine flour, salt and pepper.
  3. Immediately next to the plate of flour, mix the egg, mustard and vinegar in a shallow bowl.
  4. Finally, combine the oats, cornflakes, crackers and paprika on a large plate next to the egg mixture.
Posted on August 19, 2013

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