Tag Archives: personal

While Standing on One Foot, Deep in the South

Standing on one footBecause the Jewish population of the Deep South is small and spread out, it is common for Jews in the region to be the single source of Jewish information for Christian friends and acquaintances.  When my son was in school and any Jewish holiday came around, I would make sure he had had enough information to reply to the inevitable questions of his friends:  Why do Jews celebrate_____?  What does it mean? Why don’t Jews believe in Jesus? Why did “you” kill Jesus? Aren’t you afraid of going to hell? Is Chanukah the Jewish Christmas?

And the truth is that the questions are wonderful!  I believe it is our responsibility to be informed and have an understanding of the basics of our faith not only for ourselves but also for the friends and neighbors who—with the utmost respect—want to understand more about our religion.  Down here, each of us has to act as an ambassador of Judaism, which means doing our best to answer questions, even “while standing on one foot.”

Just last month I was getting my nails done, when the woman in the chair next to me noticed my Star of David and started overflowing with questions.  I could barely answer one before the next one came.  It was for her a rare opportunity to ask, and for me it was an honor to answer.

I think the most common misconception about Jewish life in the South is that we are faced with a tremendous amount of Anti-Semitism.  The reality is that we are faced with a lot of folks who know little about Judaism and most of the time, they simply want to be better and closer friends and neighbors!  The only way to deepen friendships is through understanding and respect.  I also believe it is our responsibility to have a basic understanding of what Christians believe.  Outreach is a two-way street!

What is your most memorable “While standing on one foot” experience?

Posted on December 17, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

At Home on the Road

By 2nd year Education Fellow Rachel Blume.

It’s the height of the fall season. Football is in full swing, Barack Obama was just re-elected as President of the United States, people are starting to make preparations for Thanksgiving, and, as an ISJL Education Fellow, my schedule is filled to the max with fall community visits!

Rachel Blume relaxes at the home of Helaine and Bill Braunig with their grandson Billy.

This means early morning airport trips, late night drives, and not much time spent in the comfort of my own home. As a creature of habit, the hectic travel of fall can be stressful to me.  In addition to that, it’s the longest stretch of the year between visits home to my family.  (Being from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, I have it easier than most of my co-fellows on this count). One of the wonderful things about this job, though, is that certain congregations provide that same sense of comfort and community that I get with friends and family, which more than compensates for the time on the road.  In particular, Shreveport, Louisiana has become my home away from home.

Just a couple of weekends ago, I was packing my bags to make the short (at least by ISJL standards) 3 and ½ hour drive over to Shreveport. Even though I knew I had a full weekend of leading services and programs, each mile that I drove it felt less and less like a business trip and more like a trip to visit my “other family.” I don’t even need my GPS to find Helaine and Bill Braunig’s home because I now know it so well; sometimes I even get the chance to hang out with their adorable grandson Billy (see above). I don’t have to worry about getting a tour of anything, because I already know where everything is. When I go to Shreveport, the usual anxieties of a work trip melt away. I feel at home.

Posted on November 7, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

On “Hava Nagila”

A still from Hava Nagila (the Movie), directed by Roberta Grossman, which premiered at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival in July 2012. Photo copyright Jenny Jimenez.

I am a music snob. People know this about me, and I deserve the title.  I have said hurtful things in the past, and if you were on the receiving end of any of my snobbery, I apologize (unless I was right).

My snobbery extends to Jewish music, as well.  My master’s thesis, after all, is entirely about the history and meanings of contemporary klezmer, a musical genre descended from the instrumental music of Eastern European Jews.

So, in preparation for my wedding last weekend, one question loomed larger than any other: what to do about “Hava Nagila?”

I won’t recap the entirety of the song’s history, ubiquity and supposed fall from favor, but it is fair to say that I fall into the camp of concerned listeners who hear it as a schlocky piece of music that has come to stand in for a much richer repertoire of celebratory Jewish tunes.  But people expect it.  After a few fraught exchanges with our wedding DJ and extended consultation with fellow music snobs, I came to the following conclusion: the DJ could begin with the version of “Hava Nagila” he’d originally proposed—the beginning of a pretty canned medley of Hebrew songs—so long as he faded into my preferred tracks. The opening “Hava Nagila” got people dancing in a circle and cued our friends to lift me and my bride up in our chairs, but by the time I was safe on the ground again, I was able to dance to Jewish music I actually enjoy.

So here are the tunes I picked:

This is a live video of Maxwell Street Klezmer Band> performing “Chusn Kalleh Mazl Tov.” I picked a studio recording of the track from their 2002 album Old Roots New World.

And a personal favorite, Frank London’s Klezmer Brass Allstars doing “Lieberman Funky Freylekhs,” from the 2002 album, Brotherhood of Brass. Just hit the play button below.

Liebermann Funky Freylekhs

Posted on October 24, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy