Serves
8 servings

Smoked Salmon and Goat Cheese Quiche

Though most Jews name Hanukkah, Purim or Passover as their favorite of the many (many) holidays, I have always been a little partial to Yom Kippur. For real.

Daily life can be so hectic, between keeping up with Netflix and waiting in line for your daily Pumpkin Spice Latte, so having a day dedicated to reflection and atonement (in between naps and binge watching The Food Network) is a meaningful change of pace. And of course, at the end of the day of fasting, there’s the food.

Our break fast spread was as traditional as they come. Kugels, coffee cake, an assortment of rarely-touched pre-made Italian cookies from the local Jewish supermarket, and the pièce de résistance, the bagel spread. When pangs of hunger set in during the final hours, this is what I focused on. Dozens of bagels, lox, red onions, tomatoes, capers, and an assortment of cream cheeses from chive to strawberry. While others were vying for an end piece of coffee cake, I went straight for the good stuff. Half of an everything bagel, never scooped, schmeared with plain cream cheese, lots of lox, red onions and capers. Always a delicious meal, but especially after a day of fasting.

Smoked Salmon and Goat Cheese Quiche slice1

This year, I decided to take all my favorite bagel toppers and put them in a quiche. I love quiche, but hadn’t made one since culinary school. The salty capers and smoked salmon paired with creamy tart goat cheese and sweet red onions is pretty magical. I highly recommend the homemade crust; the flakiness is worth the extra effort. The best part is (okay, besides the eating part) that you can easily make this ahead of time and serve at your break fast.


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Ingredients

For the crust:

1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling dough

¼ tsp salt

¼ tsp sugar

1 stick (1/2 cup) butter, chilled in the freezer and diced

2-4 Tbsp ice water

For the quiche filling:

½ small red onion, cut into thin slivers

1 Tbsp olive oil

Salt

2 Tbsp capers

3 large eggs

1 cup whole milk

½ cup heavy whipping cream

½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

¼ tsp ground nutmeg

4 ounces smoked salmon, diced

4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled

Directions

To make dough, whisk together flour, salt, and sugar. Then add in butter and mix with hands until you have a coarse, crumbly mixture. (Alternatively, you can use a food processor.) Add in water 1 tablespoon at a time until the dough comes together. Be careful not to over mix. Form dough into a disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Roll out dough on a lightly flowered surface into a 12-inch circle. Place it in a tart pan and press down to fit in the edges. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Line dough with parchment paper and fill 2/3 of the way with pie weights or dried beans. Bake until crust is set, about 12-15 minutes.

Carefully remove paper and bake until golden brown, an additional 8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool on a wire rack.

Meanwhile, make the filling. In a large sauté pan, heat up olive oil over medium heat. Sauté red onions with a pinch of salt until the start to soften and brown, about 5 minutes. Then add capers and sauté for another 3 minutes. Set aside to cool.

In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, cream, black pepper and nutmeg. Once crust is cooled, sprinkle half of the onion mixture, goat cheese and smoked salmon on the bottom of the crust. Pour over egg mixture and dollop with remaining ingredients. Bake until quiche is set but still slightly jiggly in the center, about 30 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes and serve.

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