5 Jewish Sandwiches that Everyone at Work Will Envy

School is back in session, and with that comes plenty of good discussion on quick and easy-to-pack lunches. But how about some ideas for not-sad lunches for us nine-to-fivers?

If you typically stick to sandwiches, we don’t blame you. They’re the easiest things to pack and eat–we all have to eat at our desks, sometimes! There are so many mouthwatering flavor combinations to consider, whether you’re after a classic lox and schmear or perhaps something more innovative. Here are five ways to build the sandwich of your dreams.

Schnitzel and Sumac Slaw Sandwich (above)
With a little extra effort, you’ll be in sandwich heaven. For this sandwich, you’ll make your slaw and fry the chicken schnitzel the night before. In the morning, just pack the slaw, schnitzel, and slices of bread separately to prevent the bread and schnitzel from getting soggy. Put it all together at work, and enjoy what’s probably the best lunch you’ve ever packed.

Image from Boulderlocavore.com
Image from Boulderlocavore.com

Pastrami on Rye
from Boulder Locavore

You’ll really have something to look forward to at lunch with this classic deli sandwich. Make the coleslaw the night before, but pack separately so that the bread doesn’t get soggy. Although some assembly is required, it’s worth it!

Image from Bonapetit.com
Image from Bonappetit.com

Roasted Eggplant and Pickled Beet Sandwich
from Bon Appetit

If you’re going meatless, you don’t have to stick to hummus and lettuce–try roasted eggplant and pickled veggies to keep things interesting! The night (or a few nights) before, just roast slices of eggplant and store in the fridge until you need it. The pickled beet salad, accented with olives, fresh herbs and scallions, can also be made ahead of time, with pickled beets from the grocery store (or pickle them yourself!).

Smoked Salmon Sandwich

Gravlax with Cream Cheese 

If you’ve never made your own lox before, you’re in for a surprise: it’s one of the easiest Jewish foods you can make. You’ll impress everyone at work when they find out you cured it yourself (i.e. let it sit in the fridge for a few days covered in salt, sugar, and herbs). The possibilities are endless: put it between two slices of rye and cream cheese, with some sprouts (above) or enjoy in a wrap or with a fresh bagel. It’s also a great salad topper.

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Pastrami Sandwich Challah
This might be the ultimate sandwich for the person on-the-go. You’re essentially making several sandwiches at once by filling the challah with slices of mouthwatering pastrami and some mustard before you bake it. Pack a big slice for lunch, with some apple slices and celery on the side for good measure.

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