Turmeric: 5 Ways to Use More of This Healthy Spice

Until recently, turmeric was a relatively under-utilized member of the spice rack. You might have sprinkled it into a curry every now and then, or wondered what to do with it.

And this is what food trends are great for–suddenly, overnight, the unsung hero of your refrigerator or pantry finally becomes the Next Big Thing.

It seems like turmeric is “in” for all the right reasons: it’s got a delicious savory, mustardy flavor, it’s easy to cook with, and it happens to be super healthy. In addition to offering a delightful yellow-orange color and plenty of health benefits, turmeric lends an invigorating flavor to whatever you’re cooking. Here are 5 ways you can get in on this new food trend:

1. Roast it
Saffron and Turmeric Roast Chicken from The Weiser Kitchen
Turmeric Spiced Eggplant with Israeli Couscous from Finger, Fork and Knife
Yemenite Hawaij Spice Rub from The New York Times
Turmeric Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Smoky Tahini from The Baker Who Kerns

turmeric tea

2. Drink it
Turmeric Milkshake from Nutrition Stripped
Turmeric Golden Milk Tea from Wellness Mama
Turmeric Tonic from Bon Appetit
Orange Turmeric Margaritas from Vintage Kitty
Mango and Coconut Smoothie from My New Roots

3. Add it to Falafel or Hummus
Yellow Falafel from Tori Avey
Turmeric Spiced Hummus from Deliciously Ella

sweet RH rice main

4. Add it to Rice and Grains
Sephardic Jeweled Rice from The Nosher (above)
Turmeric Coconut Lentil Quinoa Bowl from May I Have That Recipe
Ottolenghi Rice with Poached Eggs from The New York Times

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5. Bake with it
Ottolenghi’s Cauliflower Cake from the Smitten Kitchen
Sfouf, Middle Eastern Turmeric Cake from May I Have That Recipe (above)
Blood Orange Turmeric Upside Down Cake from Cooking on the Weekends

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