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Fifteen Profound Teachings from The Thirteen Petalled Rose by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz

Hosted By: Valley Beit Midrash

Arthur Kurzweil will explore 15 of the many profound and fundamental ideas of Jewish theology to be found in the contemporary classic, The Thirteen Petalled Rose, written by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz.

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Teacher

Arthur Kurzweil

Arthur Kurzweil is the author of The Encyclopedia of Jewish Genealogy as well as My Generations: A Course in Jewish Family History. My Generations is a popular textbook that has been used for almost twenty years in many synagogue schools throughout the United States and Canada. Arthur has had a lifelong passion for books. Trained as a professional librarian, editor-in-chief of the Jewish Book Club for 17 years, past president of the Jewish Book Council, Judaica acquisitions editor and literary agent, Arthur Kurzweil came to a personal conclusion that the ultimate book for him is the one often described as the cornerstone of Jewish culture, the Talmud. Arthur Kurzweil is the recipient of the Distinguished Humanitarian Award from the Melton Center of Ohio State University for his unique contributions to the field of Jewish education. 
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Host

Valley Beit Midrash Logo

Valley Beit Midrash

Valley Beit Midrash (VBM), based in Phoenix, AZ, hosts Jewish learning events on a wide range of topics and perspectives.
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