The Violation of Dinah; The Violation of our Society

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The following is adapted from the drasha (sermon) delivered by Rori Picker Neiss at Bais Abraham Congregation, St Louis, MO on November 17, 2013, Shabbat Parshat Vayeitzei.  Rori serves as Director of Programming, Education and Community Engagement at Bais Abraham as she completes her studies at Yeshivat Maharat.

Come hear Rori Picker Neiss speak at the JOFA conference about new directions for women and mikveh. Register today! http://www.jofa.org/2013conference


Come hear Rori Picker Neiss speak at the JOFA conference about new directions for women and mikveh. Register today!

I used to think that the Torah was a story of God, and, as such, was a story of heroes, of bravery, and of goodness. Perhaps that is how my teachers had wanted me to see it. I learned of the heroism of Noah, who saved humanity from total extinction. I learned of the bravery of Abraham, who argued with God in defense of the wicked people of Sodom and Gemorrah. I learned of the never-ending compassion that God displays towards the Jewish people.

The Torah is not a story of God, though; it is a story of humans. While humans can be heroic, brave, and good, they can also be corrupt, oppressive, and depraved.

There is one story in the Torah in particular that we often slide right past. It is a story we do not like to teach in schools, and one we often do not want to discuss openly. It is a story that is not easy to tell, but one that we need to tell. It is a story of corruption, of oppression, and of depravity.

In this week’s parsha, Parshat Vayishlach, Jacob’s daughter, Dinah, is forcibly taken, and raped.

She is raped by Shechem, a man of power, the son of the head of the city, the namesake of the town.

As if the story itself would not be shocking and disturbing enough already with those details, the story unfolds in a surprising way. It begins:

וַתֵּצֵא דִינָה בַּת-לֵאָה, אֲשֶׁר יָלְדָה לְיַעֲקֹב, לִרְאוֹת, בִּבְנוֹת הָאָרֶץ.

Now Dinah, the daughter whom Leah had borne to Jacob, went out to visit the daughters of the land. (Genesis 34:1)

Posted on November 21, 2013
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