The Jewish Cuisine of Poland and Russia

Pickled cucumbers, borscht, kasha varnishkes, and knishes are just some of the stick-to-your-ribs foods that Polish and Russian-Jewish Cuisine is best known for. It’s no longer everyday fare, but rather the kind of meal that you cook when you’re craving something to combat the chilliest winter night.

These grainy stews, pickled fishes and soups were dishes developed out of the harsh environmental and political climates of these regions. Driven out of Germany, France and Italy, Jews went eastward to Poland and Russia, where Byzantinian Jews had settled centuries before. They brought with them several dishes that originated in Germany, like challah bread and gefilte fish, and adopted new tastes and traditions as they moved throughout Eastern Europe and Russia.

Though they’re often lumped together, Polish, Lithuanian and Russian Jewish cuisines are actually quite different. Check out this article and the recipes below to find out more!

Lightened-Up Kasha Varnishkes
Borscht
Schav (sorrel soup)
Dill Pickles
Chrein (pickled horseradish)
Blintzes
How to Make Potato Knishes
Cheese Lokshen Kugel
Cinnamon Noodle Kugel

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