schnitzel and sumac slaw sandwich
Serves
4 servings

Schnitzel and Sumac Slaw Sandwich Recipe

Schnitzel was something my mom made every week. Israeli schnitzel is most always made with thinly pounded chicken that is coated in breading and pan-fried. Every child growing up in an Israeli home had this at least once a week without fail. My mom can basically make it in her sleep and I think her recipe is particularly delicious. And I am sharing my mom’s secrets for perfect schnitzel: Dijon mustard in the egg wash plus panko mixed into the breadcrumbs. She doesn’t know I am sharing this, so please – let’s keep this between us. Sorry, mom.

schnitzel and sumac slaw sandwich vertical

Normally, schnitzel is served on a platter with Israeli salad and rice or mashed potatoes. I’ve taken the basic schnitzel and sandwich-ified it. This is my Israeli take on a fried chicken sandwich. Feel free to double up on the schnitzel and double stack it for an extra large bad boy. The chicken is super crispy and juicy and the slaw adds the perfect amount of zing and freshness to the sandwich. If you can find Israeli pickles, that’s best for the flavor combination. And don’t you dare skimp on that mayo.

The following recipe is excerpted from Danielle Oron’s cookbook Modern Israeli Cooking. Stay tuned this week to win a copy of the cookbook!

 

Schnitzel and Sumac Slaw Sandwiches

Ingredients

For the sumac slaw:

2 cups finely shredded cabbage

1 cup finely shredded purple cabbage

1/2 cup shredded carrot

1/4 cup roughly chopped cilantro

1/4 cup full fat mayonnaise

2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

1 Tbsp honey

1 tsp sumac

1 tsp salt

1/4 tsp fresh black pepper

For the schnitzel:

2 skinless boneless chicken breasts

salt for seasoning

1/2 cup all purpose flour

2 large eggs

1 1/2 Tbsp Dijon mustard

2/3 cup plain bread crumbs

2/3 cup panko bread crumbs

1 tsp sesame seeds

1 tsp salt

1/4 tsp fresh black pepper

canola oil for frying

ciabatta (or other fresh bread) cut into 4 and sliced open

mayonnaise

Israeli pickles or kosher dill pickles, sliced

Directions

Combine the cabbages, carrots and cilantro in a large bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, vinegar, honey, sumac, salt and pepper. Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Set this in the fridge until ready to construct the sandwiches.

Slice each chicken breast into two pieces lengthwise as if you were butterflying the breast open, but just cut through. Pound each piece between 2 pieces of parchment paper as this as possible using a mallet or the heel of your hand. Should be between about 1/2-inch (12mm) thick. Season both sides with a generous amount of salt.

Prepare the breading station in baking pans or shallow bowls. In the first, place the flour. In the second, whisk together the eggs and mustard. The last, combine the plain breadcrumbs, panko, sesame seeds, salt and pepper.

Heat a large skillet with 1/3 inch (8.5cm) of canola oil over medium heat. Once the oil is hot and rippling, dredge the chicken in the flour, shake off the excess, dip it into the egg wash, let the excess drip off, and then place it into the breadcrumb mixture. I press the breadcrumbs into the chicken with the heel of my hand to ensure it sticks on there well.

Place the breaded breast straight into the oil. Continue with the rest of the chicken.

Don’t bread the chicken until just before you place it in the hot oil to ensure that it won’t get soggy. Fry for 3 minutes on each side or until it’s golden brown. Transfer onto a cooling rack. Season them with salt immediately.

Construct the sandwiches by smearing a very good amount of mayonnaise on both sides of the ciabatta. Place the schnitzel on the bread, top with the sumac slaw and pickles.

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