A Passover Cooking Experience (and Recipe)

Rachel Saks has an M.S. in Education and is a Registered Dietitian. She developed and ran Healthy Living, a Camp Ramah program that combines nutrition education, mindful eating, cooking instruction and physical activity. Rachel is also the co-author of “Jewish American Food Culture.”

Even though the Purim costumes have barely been packed away and there are still one or two lonely poppy seed hamentaschen sitting on your counter, it’s time to think about Passover.  Will you be having guests for
seder
or going to celebrate with friends and family?  Who will be invited?  What kind of
haroset
will you make this year?  What kind of medication will you stock in the medicine cabinet for the inevitable mid-week tummy troubles?  All of these are important questions to answer, but it’s also important to stop for a moment to think about another, slightly bigger question:  How will you engage your children in preparations for the holiday this year in a way that will bring your whole family a deeper, more spiritual understanding of Passover?

Sure, you can ask your children to help clean the house of
chametz
, but doing so won’t give them a context for understanding the holiday, primarily because it involves simply doing something rather than immersion in an experience. Jewish camps excel at experiential learning by creating a context for activities rather than going through the actions by rote.  Camps deeply engage campers with Judaism at a young age, leading them to develop a desire for connectivity to the Jewish community and to the formation of a strong Jewish identity.

RachelOne of the greatest and most exciting ways for kids to experience Judaism and Passover is in the kitchen.  With their hands in kugel and their minds on the laws of
kashrut
for Passover, kids have the opportunity to learn through doing on this holiday.  Teach them about what it means to be kosher-for-Passover and engage them in helping to prepare your kitchen for the holiday.  Work with your children to find interesting recipes and to plan, shop, and cook with them. Notice the pride they exhibit when mastering a task in the kitchen (just like the pride they had last summer when they perfected their 3-point shot or got up on water skis!) and revel in the fact that they are experiencing and understanding Passover on a whole new level.

Posted on March 19, 2013

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