Parashat Nitzavim

Self Deception

Before the Children of Israel enter the land, Moses cautions them against self-deception, an appropriate warning for the high holidays as well.

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The biggest problem is the last clause of the verse: "thus sweeping away the moist with the dry." The simplest explanation of this image is that it is "all-inclusive," like saying "day and night," or "soup to nuts." The disobedient one will end up being "swept away" entirely; alternatively, he will bring disaster among the entire nation (Jewish Publication Society Commentary).

Rashi, on the other hand, sees the word sfot, which I am translating as "swept away," as being related to the word for "added," which has a similar root. Thus Rashi sees "adding the moist to the dry" as God adding punishments upon punishments for his sins.

Ramban has yet a third interpretation: this person is "giving himself a blessing" when all the other Israelites are hearing the curses related in chapter 28. He thinks that by exempting himself, the consequences won't apply. Furthermore, according to Ramban, to "add moist to the dry" is a description of the psychological consequences of "following" one's problematic desires: first somebody does something they ought not do, and then they keep on doing different forbidden things, looking for a greater thrill every time, constantly needing to "up the ante" in order to find temporary satisfaction of their desires.

All of these interpretations offer a more detailed explanation of the basic problem: this person (or group) that Moses warns about is in utter denial of the consequences of their actions. As Ramban points out, they are deluding themselves if they think that they can exempt themselves from the same conditions that apply to everybody around them. Whether they have mistaken ideas, or they are arrogant, or painfully naive, a person in denial can create big problems for themselves and those around them.

The specific issue that Moses addresses--worshipping the deities of the ancient nations--may not be much of a problem anymore, but the human capacity for self-deception remains with us always. People are often prone to think that "the rules" apply to everybody but themselves; whether in the realm of health, ethics, or simply the inevitable consequences of our actions, the refusal to confront reality is a pervasive and destructive force in human existence.

When you eat too much junk food, it's not healthy for your body; when you tell little distortions of the truth, it's not healthy for your relationships; when you consistently put off prayer and good deeds, it's not good for your soul. These are teachings we all know, but all too often, try to forget.

Thus it's especially appropriate to read these words the week before Rosh Hashanah. On the Days of Awe, we are challenged to fearlessly review our deeds: did we do what we ought? Did we do things we shouldn't have? Are our relationships in order--with ourselves, with others, with God? Are we like the "self-blesser" that Ramban imagines, telling ourselves that it's going to be all right, because the basic laws of nature and morality don't really apply to me? (I, for one, am still firmly convinced that I can eat chocolate and cookies and not gain weight.)

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Rabbi Neal J. Loevinger

Rabbi Neal Joseph Loevinger is currently the rabbi of Temple Beth-El in Poughkeepsie, NY. A former student at Kolel, he served as Kolel's Director of Outreach from late 1999-2001. He was ordained in the first graduating class of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies of the University of Judaism, and holds a Master's of Environmental Studies from York University in Toronto.