Cherishing What Is Broken

In this parashah, when the tablets were broken, we picked them up and valued the pieces.

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Reprinted with permission from Torah Topics for Today.

We are each our own harshest critics. It is very easy to see our own flaws and what we could do better. We dwell on things in ourselves that others don't even notice. But this does not prevent us also from seeing flaws in those around us. Often it is easy to focus on what is not as we would like. But these flaws, like veins in a beautiful gem, are what remind us that we are each unique creations. Imagine how boring the world would be if we were all perfect and no butterfly were brighter or duller than another.

Furious because the Children of Israel had built the Golden Calf in his absence, Moses threw the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments to the ground nearly immediately after receiving them. They shattered into a million pieces. What happened to the shattered tablets? The obvious thing to do would have been to throw them away. But they were swept up and collected. They were kept and cherished alongside the new tablets that God commanded Moses to make.

Chershi What is  BrokenIn the parashah, when the tablets were broken, we picked them up and valued the pieces. So too, with ourselves, we ought to cherish these broken pieces, these pieces that we maybe wish weren’t there. The broken pieces of tablets are a metaphor for the parts of ourselves that are less than perfect. These parts are sacred and we need to "pick them up," with honor, in our life's journey.

TALK TO YOUR KIDS about why they might have kept the broken tablets.

CONNECT TO THEIR LIVES:

· Have you ever kept a toy even though it was broken? Why?

· What is one thing about yourself that you could try to like more?

· How can we learn to be more patient with ourselves and each other?

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Judith Greenberg was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary. She is now a rabbi and new mother living in Chicago.