The Power of We

Everyone's contribution, and occasionally sacrifice, is necessary.

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Reprinted with permission from Torah Topics for Today.

As parents, we all know how much work goes into running a household. Nothing happens by itself; someone must do the dishes, make lunches, drive carpool, go shopping, etc. Children need to have the confidence that they're cared for, but they should eventually learn about the efforts involved and what they can do to pitch in. How do we balance the two ideals?

In our portion, the Jewish people constructed the Sanctuary (Mishkan). All members of the community were required to do their part, commensurate with their abilities. Whether the contribution took the form of a donation or volunteering, each and every person's involvement was a crucial element in reaching the final product. Only with everyone's participation did the Sanctuary become a special place.

The Power of WeIt's easy to take things for granted. Our children grow up in a society of plentitude and become used to things being there for him or her. Yet, it takes hard work to create anything. A household can only function properly with the labors of hard-working parents, and a special environment can only be achieved by way of planning and effort. Everyone's contribution, and occasionally sacrifice, is necessary. Young children can be given small tasks in relation to their age and congratulated for pitching in. Putting away clothes, washing dishes, making their bed, all are helpful for the family effort. If we model chores correctly ourselves, they can even be seen as a privilege. Being a part of a family beyond only our own needs, all contributing commensurate with their abilities, makes a home very special.

TALK TO YOUR KIDS about the power of WE - with everyone working together for the good of all.

CONNECT TO THEIR LIVES:

· Name five actions or activities your parents do for your family.

· Would you be OK if some of these things were missing?

· What do you do to pitch in?  What more could you do?

· How do you feel when you know that others appreciate what you do?

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Rabbi Moshe Becker is a co-founder of the Jewish Renaissance Experience, an innovative Jewish education and outreach program in Westchester County, NY. He has done advanced research in Jewish Law, philosophy and history at The Jerusalem Kollel and with the Hashkafa Circle and has lectured and written extensively on these topics.