Honoring Parents

We must teach our children how to honor parents properly.

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Reprinted with permission from Torah Topics for Today.

In all likelihood, as children we were told to honor our parents. It’s one of those things that parents like, and by now we know why. As parents, we expect our children to listen to and do everything we want them to. In truth, though, honoring parents should not entail giving up one’s own life and dreams.

In this week's Torah portion Abraham’s trusted servant Eliezer approached Rebecca’s father, asking for permission to bring her back as a wife for Abraham’s son Isaac. Laban, Rebecca's brother, in utter disrespect of his father, jumped up and responded before his father could.

The Ten Commandments says to "Honor your Parents." It does not command "love" your parents. The Torah is very free with the word love in love the stranger, love your neighbor, and love G-d; however, it had the brilliance to recognize possible difficulties some may have with parents. At the very least, the Torah states that parents are always to be honored. Whether we agree or disagree, we must do so with deference and respect. We must look out for their needs with the same sense of responsibility they had when they cared for us. We must teach our children how to honor parents properly. Encourage them to express their opinions in a respectful way, whether or not they agree with you. And of course, model the same behavior in your own interactions with your parents. They will learn the most from that.

TALK TO YOUR KIDS about how honoring parents is a form of gratitude.

CONNECT TO THEIR LIVES:

· Why honor your parents? 

· Can you name some opportunities to show honor to your parents?  

· When we are angry with our parents, how should we behave towards them?

 

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Rabbi Moshe Becker is a co-founder of the Jewish Renaissance Experience, an innovative Jewish education and outreach program in Westchester County, NY. He has done advanced research in Jewish Law, philosophy and history at The Jerusalem Kollel and with the Hashkafa Circle and has lectured and written extensively on these topics.