Mozzarella in Carrozza

Combining the Hanukkah traditions of eating fried foods and cheese.

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  1. Yield: 2 sandwiches
  2. Prep: 10 minutes
  3. Cook: 15 minutes
  4. Total: 25 minutes
carrozza-hp.jpg

For food lovers, Hanukkah is an eight-day period in which to justify that guilty pleasure, deep-fried food. Latkes and sufganiyot (jelly donuts) might be the most traditional Hanukkah fare, but they are the tip of the iceberg when it comes to things improved by a hot oil bath.The reason we eat fried foods on Hanukkah is well-known, if not entirely logical. Because a one-day supply of oil kept the menorah in the Temple lit for eight full days, we have the tradition of consuming as much oil as we can, in remembrance of the miracle. And the custom of eating cheese harkens back to the story of Judith, who killed the Greek general Holfernes by plying him with wine and cheese.

Armed with a legitimate excuse to deep-fry some cheese, I took to the kitchen in search of the perfect recipe for one of my favorite weekend lunches, Mozzarella in Carrozza. In Carrozza is Italian for “in a carriage.” The name is apropos: fresh mozzarella cheese is sandwiched between slices of white bread and cradled in a cloak of flour and egg, then fried golden-crisp in a bath of butter and olive oil. After a turn over the heat, the mozzarella melts, the bread crisps up, and the sandwich becomes the sort of thing you must eat, immediately, and possibly a few times in a row.

After making a straightforward version of this sandwich a few times, I decided to change it up. Inspired by a recipe for salt and pepper French toast on the website Food52, I've taken the sandwich in a more overtly savory direction, adding cilantro, chives, scallions, and sriracha (a red chili sauce) to the egg batter. The result is plenty spicy, and the herbs bring freshness and levity to an otherwise indulgent dish. The original is good, but this version is downright addictive.

Ingredients

  1. 1 teaspoon sriracha
  2. 2 Tablespoons ketchup
  3. 1 teaspoon sriracha
  4. Salt and pepper to taste
  5. 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  6. 3 Tablespoons butter
  7. 1 sprig cilantro, chopped
  8. 5 chives, chopped
  9. 1 scallion, chopped
  10. 1 egg, beaten
  11. 3 Tablespoons flour
  12. 1/2 cup whole milk
  13. 1 ball fresh mozzarella, sliced
  14. 6 slices white bread, crusts removed

Directions

Lay 3 slices of bread on a cutting board or work space. Distribute mozzarella slices on the bread. Top each with another slice, and crimp or pinch the edges of the two slices together to form a pouch around the cheese. You should have three sandwiches.

Put milk in one bowl, flour in a second bowl, and beaten egg, herbs, and sriracha in a third bowl. Add salt and pepper to the egg mixture.

Dunk both sides of each sandwich in the milk, then in the flour, and finally, in the egg. Meanwhile, heat 1/2 tablespoon of butter and 1/2 tablespoon oil in a medium frying pan over medium heat. When butter starts to sizzle, place one sandwich in the pan. (If your pan is large enough to hold two at once, add twice the butter and oil, and place a second sandwich in the pan.)

After 2 minutes, check the underside of the sandwich. When it is golden brown, flip and cook the other side another 2-3 minutes, until golden. Repeat with remaining sandwiches.

Meanwhile, make dipping sauce by combining 2 tablespoons ketchup with 1 teaspoon sriracha. Serve sandwiches as soon as they're ready, with dipping sauce on the side.

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Rivka Friedman is a native Washingtonian, back in her home town after stints in Manhattan and Jerusalem. She spends the lion's share of her free time cooking up a storm and making pottery in which to serve said cooking. With whatever time remains, Rivka maintains a food blog, NotDerbyPie, where she catalogs her cooking adventures and posts photos that'll make you hungry.

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