Taking the Bat out of Batman

The Messiah will come only when he is no longer necessary.”Franz Kafka, Parables and Paradoxes.

In the up coming, and probably final installment of director Christopher Nolan’s Batman run, The Dark Knight Rises, Batman returns to save Gotham once again (starring Christian Bale as the Caped Crusader – to be released July 20th, to see the trailer click here).  In the story, it’s been eight years since New York, I mean Gotham City, last saw Batman.  Eight years prior he branded himself a criminal in place of Harvey Dent (Two-Face), because, he felt, the city’s need to see Harvey as a hero was greater than the truth.  Now he can’t help but come back again, this time to fight a new super villain, Bane.

So, I guess we need our heroes  – or do we?

[For the real comic book nuts, eight years might be nothing compared to Batman coming out of retirement at age 55, dealing with aging and mortality as he fights for justice in Frank Miller’s 1986 instant classic, The Dark Knight Returns.  Click the above book cover to read more about it.]

There is something biblical about the least likely hero (see Time magazine’s piece the Anti-hero where TV’s hit Breaking Bad is set center stage).  My favorite Biblical outcast turned hero: Jephthah.

Jephthah the Gileadite was a mighty warrior. His father was Gilead; his mother was a prostitute.  Gilead’s wife also bore him sons, and when they were grown up, they drove Jephthah away. “You are not going to get any inheritance in our family,” they said, “because you are the son of another woman.”  So Jephthah fled from his brothers and settled in the land of Tob, where a gang of scoundrels gathered around him and followed him.

Some time later, when the Ammonites were fighting against Israel, the elders of Gilead went to get Jephthah from the land of Tob.  “Come,” they said, “be our commander, so we can fight the Ammonites.” (Judges 11:1-6).

In just six short verses the Bible establishes Jephthah as an outcast and then quickly pivots him to be a hero  (Brilliant writing!  Better, divine!).  Whether it’s David fighting Goliath, Batman saving us from the sadism of the Joker, or even Rocky fighting a Russian killing machine in a boxing ring, there is something biblical to the sense that at the brink of catastrophe a Chosen One will rescue us at the last possible second.  The Hanukkah Song, Mi Yimalel (Who Can Retell) makes the point explicit:

Posted on July 17, 2012

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