A Quarter Century, a Lifetime of Change

By Tagged: ,
View as Single Page Single Page   

Twenty-five years ago I stood with three classmates from the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College and received the title “rabbi.” After five intense years of rabbinical school, following years of preparatory Jewish study, we had arrived. The emotional and spiritual power of ordination was about achieving a dream, but it also signaled a change in our status that would forever define our identities.  As rabbis we would now bear responsibility to care for the Jewish people and repair the world, with a unique status of authority.

This past weekend my classmates and I were joined by three more colleagues, as we were honored with our Doctor of Divinity (honoris causa) degrees.  As has become custom in much of the American rabbinate we were honored with these degrees by virtue of our worthy service to the Jewish people over these twenty five years.

I have been looking forward to this moment for years. I knew it would joyous — a celebration like a significant birthday or anniversary.  Many rabbis joke that the D.D., as we all call it, means “didn’t die.”  It is a testament to a rabbi’s survival.  Reminiscent of the rude awakening I received when I went to buy disability insurance as a young rabbi.  I learned that few insurers (at the time of my career’s beginning — only two) would insure rabbis because clergy have the highest rates of disability from stress related illnesses. I still find that statistic hard to believe based on my observations, but no matter, you get the point. We laugh about celebrating survival because we worry about not surviving.  We made it, whew!

But surely, as the year and the date approached for my own D.D., I came to appreciate how important it was to celebrate more than the passage of time. This was an opportunity for reflection on the experiences of these years, with the mistakes and achievements, accomplishments and disappointments.  My colleagues and I marveled at the enormity of everything we have experienced and done during this quarter century.  Our journeys have tracked a time of tremendous change in American Judaism.

Posted on June 12, 2012
View as Single Page Single Page    Print this page Print this page

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning.com are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy