My Jewish Learning

Divorce Quiz

What are the details of ending a Jewish marriage? What contemporary concerns figure into the discussion?



Question 1. What happens to the get once it has been presented to the rabbi?
 It is filed away.
 It is torn up.
 It is publicly displayed for 14 days.
 Nothing.

 

Question 2. What is the ceremony called in which a childless widow's brother-in-law is released from his obligation to marry his late brother's wife?
 Aufruf
 Nissuin
 Halitzah
 Yibbum

 

Question 3. Which of these statements about mamzerim is true?
 They may only marry converts or other mamzerim
 They are the result of an adulterous or incestuous union
 Although they are limited in who they can marry, they suffer no other penalties according to Jewish law
 All of the above

 

Question 4. What is a ketubah?
 A marriage agreement
 A bill of divorce
 A summons to appear before the Beit Din to discuss divorce
 The written amount of money a woman gets for alimony

 

Question 5. Which of these statements best describes the Reform movement's policy on divorce?
 The moment a couple divorces in a civil court in the U.S., their marriage is considered dissolved in the eyes of Jewish law.
 A get is absolutely required, but it can be initiated by either the husband or the wife.
 A get is required to end marriages between a man and a woman, but not to end same-sex marriages.
 When a man divorces the wife of his youth, even the altar of God sheds tears.

 

Question 6. What is the Hebrew term for a woman that cannot remarry because she doesn't have a get?
 Kallah
 Ketubah
 Agunah
 Talmidah

 

Question 7. True or false: If the husband/wife cannot or do not want to be present at the divorce ceremony, they may appoint agent(s) to represent them before the rabbinic court.
 True
 False

 

Question 8. According to the Bible, who can initiate a divorce?
 The husband
 The wife
 The rabbinic court
 All of the above

 

Question 9. Is a civil divorce accepted as fully dissolving a marriage?
 No.
 Yes, according to Reform Judaism.
 Yes, according to Reform and Reconstructionist Judaism.
 Yes, according to Reform, Reconstructionist, and Conservative Judaism.

 

Question 10. Which movement offers three types of get ceremonies--one initiated by the man, one initiated by the woman, and one mutually initiated?
 Reconstructionist
 Reform
 Conservative
 Orthodox