My Jewish Learning

Jewish Theatre & Dance Quiz

From Yiddish theatre to Israeli folkdance, performing arts are a key part of Jewish self expression. How much do you know about Jewish theatre and dance?



Question 1. In the 1930s, Habimah Theatre moved from Moscow to
 Prague
 Kiev
 Tel Aviv
 New York

 

Question 2. What happened in 1933, after Hitler came to power, and Jewish actors were ousted in Germany?
 Nearly all German Jewish actors moved to America or Israel
 Jewish actors who were able to hide their Jewishness continued to star on German stages
 German Jewish actors saturated the theatre scene in Vienna, Austria
 Jewish actors and the public formed the Juedischer Kulturbund ("Jewish Cultural League")

 

Question 3. Which noted dancer made his debut at the 92nd Street Y in New York?
 Alvin Ailey
 Mikhail Baryshnikov
 Fred Astaire
 Gregory Hines

 

Question 4. Who wrote The Jew of Malta?
 William Shakespeare
 Christopher Marlowe
 Ben Jonson
 Gotthold Ephraim Lessing

 

Question 5. Which biblical character is main focus of an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical?
 Moses
 Miriam
 Joseph
 Saul
 Noah

 

Question 6. What was the central theme of the Hebrew plays written in Palestine (pre-state Israel)?
 Pioneering
 The limits of Socialism
 The dangers of capitalism
 Racism

 

Question 7. Which of the following statements about Israeli folkdance is NOT true?
 It was created by pioneers who wished to express their passion about returning to the Promised Land
 It became a national pastime in Israel
 It is an important way for Jews outside of Israel to connect with the Jewish state
 It is highly competitive

 

Question 8. In the 18th century, which group of Jews introduced ecstatic dancing into Jewish ritual and worship?
 Reform Jews
 Moroccan Jews
 Hasidic Jews
 Jewish immigrants to America

 

Question 9. Which of these biblical women is associated with dance?
 Sarah
 Rachel
 Miriam
 Hannah

 

Question 10. What is most responsible for the end to Yiddish theatre in Europe?
 Almost all Yiddish actors moved to America by the turn of the 20th century
 Almost all Yiddish-speaking audiences moved to America by the turn of the 20th century
 After World War I, Jews in Europe prefered not to speak Yiddish
 The Holocaust