My Jewish Learning

Nature & the Environment Quiz

The environment impacts so many aspects of life, from the air we breathe to the water we drink. How much do you know about green issues in Jewish thought and practice?



Question 1. According to the 13th Century Seder Hahinukh, righteous people should grieve when what seed is wasted?
 Mustard
 Apple
 Dill
 Pumpkin

 

Question 2. Saadiah Gaon provided three possible reasons as to why God created animals. Which of these reasons is NOT one of his explanations.
 God willed it and it is not for humans to question God's will
 God created animals as a backup plan in case humans destroyed the earth
 God created animals to help reveal Gods vast wisdom to humans
 God created animals for human benefit

 

Question 3. What is the traditional Jewish theological understanding of humanity’s relationship with the earth?
 The heavens are for God and the earth was set aside for humanity, so we can do with it whatever we want
 God gives careful instructions about what parts of the environment we are free to do with as we wish, and which are to be dedicated to His glory
 To the extent that the forces of nature can be harnessed, it is the job of humanity to be the stewards of the world, and to act on behalf of God
 Each person's relationship to the environment is determined by God, and it is each person's responsibility to seek out the appropriate balance

 

Question 4. What does the Torah mandate the Jewish people do every seven years?
 Visit Jerusalem with their choicest produce
 Offer a sacrifice of grain and wine
 Allow the land to lie fallow for an entire year
 Celebrate the creation of the world

 

Question 5. According to the book of Deuteronomy 11, when humans do good things, what will God provide in return?
 Sunshine
 Spouses
 Rain and abundance
 Intelligence

 

Question 6. The word "jubilee" comes from the Hebrew word "yovel," meaning what?
 Rest
 Happiness
 Farming
 Ram's Horn

 

Question 7. Where in the Bible is the commandment to tend to and till the world?
 In Genesis, at the beginning of the Torah
 In Exodus, when the Israelites are freed from slavery
 In Deuteronomy, just before the people enter the Land of Israel
 In Isaiah, when the prophet decries humanity's actions