Around the World With Hava Nagila

Aliza Hausman, over at Memoirs of a Jewminicana clued me in to this hilarious and awesome Indian version of Hava Nagila. The mullets alone make the video worth watching, but the dancing is excellent, too.

Watching that video made me think of this fugtastic modern version, by Lauren Rose in which Hava Nagila is reimagined as a dance hit (and was marketed as a Christmas song). Rose’s additional lyrics include, “Now’s the time to do it, now’s the time to lose it, just jump, and jump, close your eyes and breathe.” The video tries to make bat mitzvah parties look cool, and doesn’t entirely succeed.

Here’s a version by a Beatles tribute band called the Moptops. It’s shockingly good.

What if Riverdance was about Jewish music and dance, instead of Irish music and dance? It exists, and they do a classic version of Hava Nagila except that a) I think the male lead dancer might actually be a woman, and b) the payes are obviously stick-on. Other than that, though, it’s great. These are the people I want leading the dancing at my wedding.

Ever wondered what Hava Nagila would sound like on the bagpipes? Now you don’t have to.

Last but not least: Russian figure skater Evgeni Plushenko used Hava Nagila as the music for his short program at the 1999 World Championship. I have never seen anyone get as roused by this music as Plushenko is.

You’re welcome.

PS: Apparently great minds think alike. Check out Amy Guth’s similar Hava Nagila roundup at Jewcy for more. Hers predates mine by almost two years, which shows just how late to the party I am.

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