Five Comix about Israel Worth Reading

As a public speaker and comic book educator, people often ask me to recommend comic books or graphic novels of Jewish interest.

Of course, I have to recommend my own graphic novel, Not The Israel My Parents Promised Me, which is just being released. However, all self-promotion aside, I thought I would also take a look at other Israel-themed comix. (Point of clarification: “comix”= comic books, graphic novels, webcomics, zines, etc.)

Some readers might be well versed in this literary nook of novel stories, memoirs, and editorial essays. Joe Sacco’s work with  Palestine and Footnotes From Gaza , Miriam Libicki’s 
Jobnik!,
and Sarah Glidden’s How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less are well regarded examples of personal accounts of Israel. However, I wanted to share some comix that continue in that vein but also veer into other territories.

Best of Enemies:A History of US and Middle East Relations, Part One: 1783-1953
By Jean-Pierre Filiu and David B. Abrams Books

For a straightforward narrative that also includes some amazing illustration, check out this book. David B. is the artist that brought you 
Epileptic
and his work is amazing. If books like this existed while you were in history class, all those wars, treaties and dead politicians would have made a lot more sense, or at least have more personality. A great book for inquisitive teens interested in history and social critique.

Farm 54
By Galit Seliktar and Gilad Seliktar

This one is the most intimate and powerful of the bunch. 
Farm 54
is composed of three semi-autobiographical vignettes that chart an Israeli girl’s growth as an adolescent to young soldier amid the realities of death and war. The book is written and drawn by a brother and sister creative team from Israel. The illustrations are evocative of print making by using a single color offset. The result is simple and stunning sequences that create a visual language that is unique and almost haunting. =”#1″>A great read for open-minded teenage girls and boys.

Posted on July 5, 2012

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