Author Archives: Rebecca Teplow

Rebecca Teplow

About Rebecca Teplow

Rebecca Teplow began her musical path as a classically trained violinist. while attending Yeshiva of Flatbush elementary school. After graduating from the prestigious High School of Performing Arts, Rebecca then went on to pursue a degree in Music Performance where she studied under violinist Itzhak Perlman and composer Robert Starer. Eventually, her thoughts turned from instrumental performance to the creation of music. Rebecca's compelling need to write songs was realized with the release of her first CD in 2004, entitled "T'filot/Prayers." Rebecca's second CD was released December 18, 2008 Rebecca's musical compositions combine her classical training along with a potent spiritual view of Jewishness. Rebecca's CDs received very positive acclaim from critics and listeners. The award-winning writer, Seth Rogovoy, listed "Prayers" among the best CD's of 2004. He stated "Teplow boasts the voice of a pop diva with a hint of Barbara Streisand, well suited to her dramatic, cello-flecked, pop-rock arrangements of Psalms and passages from Jewish wisdom literature." Zalmen Mlotek, Artistic Director of The National Yiddish Theatre-Folksbiene, states: "Rebecca Teplow’s new CD "Kaveh/Hope," is a must for anyone with interest in new music to the holy scriptures...Haunting as well as soothing, her songs resonate on a deep emotional level. Fresh and new, evoking the ancient and deeply spiritual." Tanya Krim writing in the "New Jersey Jewish Standard" described Rebecca's voice as "powerful and melifluous, reminiscent of Barbara Streisand's."

Singing is a Mitzvah

rebecca teplowI have been hiding from the audience my entire life. I am not sure if this is because I have performance anxiety or that kol b’isha erva (a woman’s voice is nakedness) has presented an obstacle. Is it both? Has my anxiety been influenced by my fear that I am not being a “good girl” when I sing in public?

After many years of “hiding” from public performance, I’m stepping onto the stage. Just thinking about it sets my heart racing. Although I am still anxious because my education defined the Jewish woman in a certain way, I have come to the conclusion that it cannot be wrong for me to use my God-given talent to help people hear their soul’s yearning for spiritual greatness. I now need to tap into my inner strength and model for my children, my students, and future generations what I believe.

I come to this concert with a singular idea: Orthodox women singing in public are an endangered species. Our people, theoretically guided by the maxim, “every Jew is responsible for all other Jews,” don’t even realize the importance of this species to the spiritual biosystem or even that it is in such danger.

Judaism teaches us to release ourselves to faith and connect to God through mitzvot. Through mitzvot, we realize that each of us is a living Sefer Torah, part of an infinite God. Everything emanates from our faith in God and our Jewish community. Much of this is accomplished by women, the core of Jewish families.

Women are creators of life, physical developers of the next generation. Jewish women also define spirituality in the home. We are Jewish because our mothers successfully connected their children to God.

“If words are the pen of the heart,” taught Rabbi Schneur Zalman “then song is the pen of the soul.” While God’s words of Torah flow down to our minds and actions, joyous song carries our souls upward to connect with the Almighty. Jewish women are connecting their children with words of Torah, but many are not tapping into the spiritual core of ecstatic singing that Rabbi Zalman spoke of.

Rabbi Herzfeld’s article, “Kol Ishah” states that many rabbis including, Rabbi Yechiel Weinberg, Rabbi Moshe Lichtenstein and Rabbi David Bigman, agree that women may sing publicly. Many in our community have not adopted this view and run the risk of destroying our spiritual community if women are treated like Dinah and locked in a box. Rabbi Herzfeld writes: “If we deny the girls of our community the ability to express themselves through song, we run the very real risk of allowing them to be serenaded by an alternative influence.” Consider Neshama Carlebach’s recent announcement that she is “making aliyah to the Reform Movement.”

Rabbi Herzfeld further points out that by not allowing women to sing, the Orthodox community is teaching men that girls “are such erotic creatures that it is impossible to have an encounter with them that is not erotic…We are in fact reinforcing the notion that our spiritual personality cannot rise above our physical nature.”

After reading Rabbi Herzfeld’s article, my interest was sparked and I did some research. It seems that the word erva comes from the root ayin-raish-hey which means to uncover, bare oneself. The idea of revelation in this root seems to be more innocent than the Gemara’s later definition of erva as unchasteness or lewdness.

Right now I choose to understand the idea of a woman’s voice as revelatory – innocent and chaste – and my songs as pronouncing the Jewish truth of holiness that is a part of our lives.

The following experience describes how redemptive music can be:

Two years ago I was wheeled into emergency surgery on Yom Kippur. Still awake, the nurse asked if she could play my CD that I had given the surgeon. I had not heard my CD in years and did not sing or listen to my music the entire time I was sick. (Often, we drift from the things we need most in our lives.) Lying on the steel table, I nodded, closed my eyes, and heard Birkat Kohanim (the priestly blessing), while the anesthesiologist told me to count back from 20. This was my prayer on Yom Kippur.

To listen to Rebecca’s music and for information about her March 9th concert in Tenafly, go to rebeccateplow.com. All proceeds will benefit JOFA.

teplow concert flyer

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Posted on February 24, 2014

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