Tag Archives: video

How did they get here?

When I tell people about Jewish families in the small towns I’ve visited, they often ask, “How did they get there?”  When I’m doing oral history interviews, I usually ask the same thing.

The most common answer is that someone (a grandparent or great-grandparent) had a cousin or sibling who was already in the area.  Many families have amusing, likely fictionalized tales of a newly arrived forebear getting off of a train at the wrong stop or landing in a small town by some other sort of accident.

In July, I interviewed Michael Korenblit, of Edmond, Oklahoma.  He shared the story of his parents, Meyer and Manya Kornblit (the last name is spelled differently due to clerical discrepancies) and their immigration to the United States.  There is much to say about Meyer and Manya, childhood sweethearts and Holocaust survivors who were reunited after World War II.  They were married shortly after the war, and their oldest son, Sam, was born while the family was living in Eggenfeld, Germany.  In the interview clip below, Michael tells how his family ended up in the small Jewish community of Ponca City, Oklahoma.


The clip is also available through the Ponca City article in our Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities.  The rest of Meyer and Manya’s story is recounted in Until We Meet Again, which Michael coauthored.

How did your family get to where they live today? Where did they come from originally?

Posted on November 5, 2012

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On “Hava Nagila”

A still from Hava Nagila (the Movie), directed by Roberta Grossman, which premiered at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival in July 2012. Photo copyright Jenny Jimenez.

I am a music snob. People know this about me, and I deserve the title.  I have said hurtful things in the past, and if you were on the receiving end of any of my snobbery, I apologize (unless I was right).

My snobbery extends to Jewish music, as well.  My master’s thesis, after all, is entirely about the history and meanings of contemporary klezmer, a musical genre descended from the instrumental music of Eastern European Jews.

So, in preparation for my wedding last weekend, one question loomed larger than any other: what to do about “Hava Nagila?”

I won’t recap the entirety of the song’s history, ubiquity and supposed fall from favor, but it is fair to say that I fall into the camp of concerned listeners who hear it as a schlocky piece of music that has come to stand in for a much richer repertoire of celebratory Jewish tunes.  But people expect it.  After a few fraught exchanges with our wedding DJ and extended consultation with fellow music snobs, I came to the following conclusion: the DJ could begin with the version of “Hava Nagila” he’d originally proposed—the beginning of a pretty canned medley of Hebrew songs—so long as he faded into my preferred tracks. The opening “Hava Nagila” got people dancing in a circle and cued our friends to lift me and my bride up in our chairs, but by the time I was safe on the ground again, I was able to dance to Jewish music I actually enjoy.

So here are the tunes I picked:

This is a live video of Maxwell Street Klezmer Band> performing “Chusn Kalleh Mazl Tov.” I picked a studio recording of the track from their 2002 album Old Roots New World.

And a personal favorite, Frank London’s Klezmer Brass Allstars doing “Lieberman Funky Freylekhs,” from the 2002 album, Brotherhood of Brass. Just hit the play button below.

Liebermann Funky Freylekhs

Posted on October 24, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Rabbi Hinchin on Dr. Jacob Rader Marcus

Dr. Jacob Rader Marcus, from the American Jewish Archives

Sometimes oral history interviews yield interesting clips that don’t have a clear home among our current history resources. Fortunately, this blog now gives me a space to share some of these selections from our archives.  The first one comes to us from an interview conducted this past June with Rabbi Martin Hinchin, who served for 31 years as rabbi of Gemiluth Chassodim in Alexandria, Louisiana.

In the clip below, Rabbi Hinchin talks about his years as a student at Hebrew Union College and his relationship with Dr. Jacob Rader Marcus.  Dr. Marcus (1896-1995) was one of the first scholars of American Jewish History and the founder of the American Jewish Archives, which were renamed for him after his death.

Posted on October 15, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy