Tag Archives: prayer

Kveller’s God Month

Full disclosure: Kveller.com is a partner site of our host, MyJewishLearning.

god-graphicIn a recent blog post on the Jewish parenting site Kveller, Joyce Anderson wrote about the process of teaching her oldest son to pray. For Anderson, teaching her child to speak to God, preceded (or facilitated, perhaps) her attempts to talk with him about God. Interestingly, Anderson is not Jewish; she is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Her article is one of several non-Jewish perspectives in Kveller’s God Month, an ongoing series on the challenges of talking to children about God.

While Anderson shows no ambivalence about encouraging her child to develop a personal relationship with the divine, the other responses in the series present more complicated experiences of parenting and faith. Among all the essays, Jewish or not, hers is the only one that takes for granted that children should believe in God. Taken together, the articles point towards a basic truth: we aren’t that good at talking about God.

At first, I found this troubling. The ambivalence about God in the Jewish responses certainly reflects editorial choices or selection bias, but it still squares with my own experience of non-Orthodox Jewish life in America. Reading through the pieces, I found myself wondering, “Do any of us simply believe?

Anderson’s prayer-based solution makes a lot of sense, especially given the deeply personal relationship between individuals and God in Christ-centered theologies. Prayer takes a central role in a few of the Jewish responses, as well, but in a different way. For the Jewish parents that write about prayer, showing a child how to pray also helps him or her relate to God personally, but the contributors’ own sense of God remains less defined. For them, the advantage of prayer is that it acknowledges and celebrates a creative force in the universe without limiting how we conceive of that force.Tellingly, of the two Jewish parents who write about sharing their personal religious practices with their children, both include prayers from Eastern traditions, like Buddhism.

Several God Month contributors—including self-identified Jews—reject the idea of God altogether, or at least bracket off questions about God’s nature and existence as unknowable and inessential to an ethical life. These writers express ambivalence about the prospect of raising a religious child, though they note the importance of teaching their kids to respect other people’s religious traditions. Some of the skeptics are attached in one way or another to Jewish culture and identity, and even want their children to have the option of choosing a more spiritual life.

Now, I’m neither traditionally observant nor deeply spiritual. I do not intend to criticize anyone’s personal practice or to bemoan some lost golden age of Jewish observance. I am struck, however, by absence of modern Jewish voices that speak confidently about God, both in the Kveller series and in my own experiences.

Perhaps, though, the issue is not that we are bad at talking about God, but that God is and should be difficult to talk about. Sometimes, especially when children come into play, we may feel need for a simpler or more concrete sense of the divine. But complete certainty (fundamentalism) is a dangerous thing, and what kind of God could be understood through mere human speech, anyway?

The tensions and contradictions expressed in the Kveller series might not reflect deficiencies in our communities, but a healthy struggle between traditional beliefs and universal values. I still hope that the series will include a Jewish writer who approaches the topic of God with more certainty and less ambiguity, but I can also accept and appreciate the articles that are there so far. They represent a real effort to do right by our children when it comes to God talk. I’m not a parent yet, but  I hope (God willing) that the questions raised by God Month are ones I will one day have to answer both for myself and my children.

Posted on May 20, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

From Georgia to Jerusalem in 6 Easy Steps: Sending Prayers to the Western Wall

An envelope of prayers from 5th grade students in Columbus, Georgia.

An envelope of prayers from 5th grade students in Columbus, Georgia.

By ISJL Education Fellow Dan Ring

The ISJL Education Curriculum addresses Israel in many ways at various grade levels. The fifth grade, for example, contains a lesson about the Western Wall (also called the Kotel) in Jerusalem. For an activity, teachers can have students write prayers to be placed in the Wall and ask their Education Fellows to arrange for the letters to reach their intended destination.

Although you can easily do this virtually through different websites, I was excited when the fifth grade class at Temple Israel Religious School in Columbus, Georgia, wrote physical letters, which I was able to have delivered through face-to-face social networks.

Here is how it went down:

1. During Lesson 7 of the 5th grade curriculum, students in Columbus composed their own prayers and put them all in an envelope.

2.  During my fall visit, the class surprised me with the collected notes.

Dan is very surprised.

Dan is very surprised.

Dan with TIRS 5th grade class-edit

After recovering from his surprise, Dan poses with the class. It was “pajama day” at the religious school.

3. Two weeks later, I attended a bar mitzvah in Baltimore, my hometown.  My friend Josh, a Yeshiva student in Jerusalem and the brother of the bar mitzvah boy, was visiting for the occasion.  So I gave him the envelope.

Josh (center) and Dan (right) celebrating together at the bar mitzvah.

Josh (center) and Dan (right) celebrating together at the bar mitzvah.

5. A few days later, Josh returned to Jerusalem, where he took the written prayers to the Wall.

Josh at the Western Wall.

Josh at the Western Wall.

Josh inserts the prayers into a crevice in the Wall.

Josh inserts the prayers into a crevice in the Wall.

6.  The prayers have been delivered (to the Wall).

The notes from Columbus, Georgia, join other prayers brought to the Western Wall.

The notes from Columbus, Georgia, join other prayers brought to the Western Wall.

Thanks again to Josh for helping out the fine students of Temple Israel, and to another Josh for taking such great photographs!

Posted on January 28, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

High Holy Days: Collective Sin, Collective Success

Within the liturgy of Yom Kippur, guilt is assumed to be collective, as we communally recite the sins. That being the case, then it is also appropriate – at this time of reflection and renewal – to acknowledge communally our triumphs and successes, as these efforts to sustain and strengthen Jewish identities and Jewish values too could not have been possible without the collective efforts of each and every one of us. Therefore, I offer the following prayer of supplication and thanksgiving for our collective success:

For the good we have done when fully aware,

And, for the good we have done even when unaware;

For the good we have done quite publically,

And, for the good we have done anonymously;

For the good we have done by using gentle comforting words,

And, for the good we have done using strong encouraging words;

For the good we have done by sticking to our principles,

And, for the good we have done through compromising them;

For the good we have done in random acts of kindness,

And, for the good we have done in not-so-random acts of kindness;

For the good we have done through passive non-violence,

And, for the good we have done through active confrontations of truth;

For the good we have done in the light of our successes,

And, for the good we have done even in our failures;

V’al kulam, Elohai ezra-ot, azor lanu, s’mach lanu, chazeik lanu,

For all these things, O’ God of our Help, aid us, support us, strengthen us.

In our work here at the ISJL, our partnerships with congregations throughout the South yield shared triumphs every single day. May this sacred cooperation continue, here in the South and throughout the Jewish world. For surely then we can say with great humility and appreciation to our Source of life and strength that while 5772 was remarkable, 5773 will be even better. L’shanah tovah, y’all!

What blessings are you giving thanks for during these 10 Days of Awe?

Note: Last year, I attended a CCAR webinar called “Prayformance and Prayticipation.” In it, Cantor Ellen Dreskin presented a positive approach to our Days of Awe, which inspired me to craft this piece.

Posted on September 21, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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