Tag Archives: pluralism

Chanukah/Hanukkah: So Many Ways to Celebrate

The Daf Yomi (Hebrew for “page a day”), is a program for learning Talmud.  Participants study one page a day, individually or in groups, and after 7 years they have read all 2,711 pages of Talmud.  Last time the cycle finished, there was a huge celebration at Met Life Stadium.  Of the 90,000 people who attended, the vast majority were Orthodox Jewish men.

Despite being interested, I hesitated because I like to look at the sources through a critical historical lens—a very different approach than that used by Orthodox Daf Yomi resources.  One day, I read about an Unorthodox Daf Yomi group on Facebook. After checking it out, I was inspired; I had to do it.  So with the help of the Koren Steinsaltz Talmud, the JCAST Network’s Daily Daf Differently podcasts, Adam Kirsch’s weekly Tablet column on the Daf Yomi, and Rabbi Adam Chalom’s Not Your Father’s Talmud blog from a few years ago, I have read through about 60 full pages.

Through this process, I have begun to make the Talmud my own.  I read the laws, discussions, and stories, and visualize how they would have applied in the Ancient Jewish world, but I can also reinterpret them to be applicable to my own life as a religiously liberal American Jew in modern times.

One of these gems is the only Talmudic mention of our current holiday, Chanukah!  While the High Holidays, Purim and Passover get their own sections, Chanukah is only mentioned once, in tractate Shabbat.  In it, along with many of the other laws of Hanukkah, the rabbis discuss how many menorahs each household should light:

The Rabbis taught: The law of Chanukah demands that every man should light one lamp for himself and his household. Those who seek to embellish the mitzvah have a lamp lit for every member of the household. (Shabbat 21b)

This passage echoes one of my favorite ideas of Judaism, that there is often more than one correct way to observe a tradition.  I would argue further that there are many ways to lead a Jewish life, including my own non-Orthodox reading of Talmud through Daf Yomi.  There is no single correct way to celebrate Hanukkah, so if you want to light one menorah for the entire household that’s great.  But if you want to light one menorah for each person in the household, that’s great too. In my house growing up, we would occasionally put up decorations and occasionally give gifts.  But always, each of us always lit his or her menorah, and every year we would take a family picture—including the dog—behind all of our Chanukah lights.

Family Hanukkah Photo: Dog Included!

Many families light the candles, play dreidel, and sing maoh tzur or other songs.  Other families, especially in this Southern land of fried food, revel in eating fried sufganyot and fried potato latkes.  I’ve heard of some people making beignets or fried chicken! A lot of Jewish children in the South (and throughout the United States) have at least one set of non-Jewish grandparents, and some families celebrate Hanukkah and Christmas, with traditions shared to acknowledge their entire family – since family, of course, is so important to us all. However you celebrate it, and however you spell it (I used a couple different spellings in this post …), have a wonderful festival of lights!

What are some of the special ways that your family celebrates Hanukkah?

 

Posted on December 14, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Dear Sarah Silverman: You’re One of My Tribe

"So, like, what is a 'Jewish woman,' anyway?"

Dear Sarah,

Hey girl! I read the open letter written to you by that rabbi in Dallas. You know, the one where he claims you’re not really a Jewish woman? ‘Cause apparently unless you’re married (presumably to a dude of Jewish descent), raising Jewish kids, refraining from “making public what is private”… the list goes on and on, but the point is: according to him, you’re not actually a Jewish woman.

And oh yeah, since you’re being cheeky while also not meeting certain critical fertility-related requirements, and therefore are not really a Jewish woman, you MUST REFRAIN FROM co-opting, referring to, or riffing on any “traditional Jewish terminology … because to do so is a lie.”

Like, that video you made encouraging folks to get out to the ballots? “Let My People Vote”? According to the letter, cease and desist, yo! You can’t use phrases like that! They rip off the Bible. You’re not really Jewish, he claims, so you have no right to such sacrilegious wordplay! More than two million views and energizing young voters, be damned! (I mean, for real. That’s what he said. Sigh.)

Well, I understand that religious differences abound. I don’t want to be disrespectful to the Texas rabbi, only two states over from me as I sit here in Mississippi. Instead, I wanted to reach out to you, to let you know that I feel your pain. ‘Cause according to him, I’m not a Jewish woman, either. Maybe I’m really a small Irish boy who practices Jain! Who knows? I am not what I thought I was!

I’m afraid a mass identity crisis may well be on the horizon. Because I’m pretty sure a lot of us ladies who thought we were Jewish – snarky, single-past-30, social-justice-oriented – just learned that we’re outta the tribe.

I guess what I’m saying is, I’m in your tribe.

So, um, what are you doing next week? Want to go get some coffee and compare comedy bits and dating advice? We can meet up wherever it is that the tribe of Make-’Em-Laugh-and-Make-a-Difference, Oops-Always-Thought-We-Were-Being-Our-Authentic-Jewish-Selves chicks are allowed to hang out.

(Also, let’s come up with a catchier name for our tribe.)

Love, Beth

PS Your dad’s responses to the piece were totally awesome, even if NSFW. Guess that runs in the family! He can be in our club, even if he’s not a Formerly Jewish Woman. I also liked him mentioning your rabbi-sister, who, incidentally, was a mentor of mine in college. Small world, huh?

Posted on October 18, 2012

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It Takes a Community: Katrina, Recovery, Resilience

Torahs being rescued from the flooded sanctuary. Photo from the website of Beth Israel.

Hurricane Katrina (and the man-made disaster of the levee breaks) struck Louisiana and Mississippi seven years ago today, with devastating effects. Now as the region prepares for Hurricane Isaac, we also remember Katrina.

In 2005, when Katrina struck, I was still living in the New Orleans area. The city and her surrounding suburbs were all affected. The Jewish community felt the wrath of the storm – particularly the Modern Orthodox synagogue, Beth Israel, which was destroyed.

At that time, I was Executive Vice President of Temple Sinai in New Orleans.  As a practicing Reform Jew, I had become involved with the local Federation, but, until then, I had not thought much about how our small Orthodox congregation benefited the whole Jewish community.  In the aftermath of the storm, every congregation, including mine, reached out to them to provide temporary worship space until they could figure out what to do next.  I found myself thinking about the interdependence of New Orlean’s Jewish community. and wondering how the loss of Beth Israel Congregation would affect the rest of our largely Reform contingent.

Rabbi Robert Loewy. From the Gates of Prayer website.

After Katrina it quickly became apparent that the Jewish community would either come together and survive as a whole or fall apart in individual efforts.  Nearly a quarter of local Jews permanently relocated in the months after the storm.  Those who remained had to embrace pluralism in a whole new way. We needed each other to survive and thrive as a Jewish community.

Under the leadership of Rabbi Robert Loewy, Metairie Reform congregation Gates of Prayer and Beth Israel formed a historical partnership, with the Orthodox congregation meeting in the Reform synagogue for the last seven years, until this past weekend.   Shared space, increased understanding and partnership between the two congregations taught the entire Jewish world the importance of community.

But why does a city need a full range of Jewish observance?  If it wasn’t for the Orthodox community, there would be no community day school.  Without a community day school, the Reform and Conservative congregations would never have been able to attract the current roster of Rabbis, Cantors and Educators who moved to the New Orleans area since Katrina.  Congregation Beth Israel also brought the amazing Rabbi Uri Topolosky, an asset to the whole city who moved to New Orleans in 2007, and has led the congregation’s rebirth.

Rabbi Topolosky with his family. From the Beth Israel website.

Of course, benefits go both ways.  Without the Reform and Conservative Jews in the city purposefully patronizing the two Kosher restaurants in town, they would not be able to stay in business in order to serve the Orthodox Jews (and many Reform and Conservative Jews) who keep Kosher.  And our efforts to reach out to the greater community are strengthened by our partnerships in the larger Jewish Federation.

In order to maintain a thriving Jewish community and give back to the city as a whole, we need each other; we are absolutely interdependent.

In August of 2010, I was privileged to attend the ground breaking ceremony of Congregation Beth Israel.  After sharing a space amicably, Congregation Gates of Prayer sold a parcel of their land to Beth Israel to build their new synagogue and permanent home.

Congregants and friends celebrate as Torah Scrolls are paraded into their new home.

Last weekend, Nes Gadol Hayah Sham (a great miracle happened there)!  After seven long years in the lovely wilderness of Gates of Prayer, Beth Israel joyfully paraded its five Torah scrolls out of the temporary space and into the Ark of their very own synagogue.  Dignitaries from federal, state and local government, along with well-wishers from the entire community were invited to be a part of that glorious day.  Yes, it was the seventh anniversary of hurricane Katrina, but much more importantly, it was the first day for Beth Israel in their own home once again.

While the congregations are now in separate buildings, they made a conscious decision to share the children’s’ play yard, so this generation and the next will never wonder quietly to themselves, “Why are the other ones important to me and the world around me?”

They will already know.

Posted on August 29, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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