Tag Archives: Passover

Thirteen Seder Virgins

On Tuesday night, I hosted a large Passover seder at my home in Jackson, Mississippi. Out of love for this Jewish dinner party, I may have opened my big mouth—then, inevitability, my door—to a few too many friends.

I realized this seder would be different as I prepared the charoset. Ever since I was old enough to wield a knife, I have been the one to slowly hand chop apples and walnuts for our family seder. It’s cathartic for me to count down the apples, add lemon juice so the apples won’t brown, and stir in the honey with my hands. After about two minutes of chopping, though, I realized my stack of apples was taller than usual; they went straight into the food processor – and this year, convenience trumped tradition, resulting in charoset with more liquid than usual.

Yikes! Why was I compromising my usual charoset consistency? Because I was too excited about sharing Passover, and ended up inviting 30 people for seder. And no, these weren’t just Jews who needed a place to go, I had 13 seder virgins! I chose to invite my non-Jewish friends and neighbors because  most of them didn’t  grow up in places with a significant Jewish population and had never been invited to help celebrate Passover. In fact, many of my guests don’t know many Jewish people besides, other than myself and other members of the ISJL staff.

seder

We went through the seder with some moments of quiet reflection, and some of laughter and levity. I encouraged guests to read along with the Hebrew transliteration, and my heart swelled when everyone’s voices joined together for “Go Down Moses.” We had a surprisingly successful gefilte fish tasting, sang a song about the afikomen to the tune of “Oklahoma” and answered a lot of questions about matzah.

Was it the most traditional or religious seder? No, not by any means. But I made that clear to my guests and encouraged them to take home the haggadahs to study up for next year. But even with soggier charoset,  I’m glad that I was able to provide some of my guests their first Jewish seder experience.

I enjoy having my home filled with friends and food, so it’s understandable why I got so excited about hosting a Passover seder. It’s a tradition that lends itself to bringing people into your house and sharing a meal that’s interactive, educational and delicious. I’m already planning for next year—with a tent outside!—and you are all invited.

Posted on March 29, 2013

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Shopping for a Southern Seder

Shopping for Passover items can be challenging in small Southern towns – and I’m sure there are others around the country who can relate to this as well. When you’re outside of a major metropolitan area, the quest for Passover foods (especially more than just matzah – although, as you’ll see, even that can get tricky…) can be a challenge.

matzo

Many grocery store managers are unfamiliar with “Kosher for Passover” merchandise, and they don’t want a lot of extra product on their shelves after the holiday. When they do stock up, though, it’s almost touching. I actually get excited when the Passover items make it to the special display in the grocery store.

What will they have this year?  Any new dessert mixes, or new flavors of macaroons? Anything new to help fill the kids’ brown bag lunches for school– especially when one child is not particularly fond of matzah or the “Passover rolls” (you know, basically the same recipe as a matzah ball but baked, not boiled – mmm!).

What amuses me is that my local grocery store has a small “Asian section” –  and somehow, that’s also the “Jewish section,” at least for part of the year. So, next to the udon noodles and fried rice mix, one can find the gefilte fish!

Of course, there’s also the fact that the stores don’t always get it right, even when they’re trying. I especially like picking up a box of matzah, suddenly available in the springtime, for Passover!– only to discover that the hechsher specifies “not kosher for Passover.”

Not very helpful, but it made me laugh. And when they do get it right, it feels even more special.

Have you had any “special” Passover shopping moments this year?

Posted on March 22, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy