Tag Archives: oil

Seminole’s Henry Katz Shares Stories with Style

Since the 1940s, the Jews of Seminole, Ada, Nowata, and Shawnee, Oklahoma, have met at the Seminole Hebrew Center for religious services and social events.  In the clip below, which is featured on our Online Encyclopedia article for Ada/Seminole, lifelong Ada resident Henry Katz talks about the origins of the Hebrew Center.

I love this excerpt for a number of reasons. Katz, who descends from German-speaking immigrants who arrived in the United States after the Civil War, alludes to the distinction between his decidedly Reform family and the newer arrivals, who were more observant. Then, as evidence of his family’s assimilation, he uses the word “phylacteries” to describe what most traditional Jews would call “tefillin.”  As a professor once told me, “no one who wears phylacteries says “phylacteries.”  

The story also illustrates the influence of economics on Jewish (and general) migration patterns. In this case, the arrival of recent immigrants to the booming towns above the Seminole oil field influenced the development of the local Jewish community.

Apparently, people used to play a lot of cards.  Bridge, canasta, all types of poker—nearly everyone I speak with reports that they or their parents participated in regular card games, inside or outside the Jewish community.  Katz attributes the men’s gambling habits to the oil business, which is a clever connection to make.  I would also point out that many of these men were also immigrants from Eastern Europe; it was a gamble, or a series of them, that had brought them to Oklahoma in the first place.

Finally, Katz has a great voice and tells his story with real style.  Reviewing his interview and putting together this clip brought back memories of a pleasant morning spent in Ada at the end of a successful research trip to Oklahoma.

I’d like to thank Henry Katz for sharing his story with us.  Credit is also due to summer oral history intern Jonayah Jackson for the quality of the video.

Posted on December 5, 2012

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