Tag Archives: empowerment

Legal Role Models (Or, Sometimes You Really Can Put a Face to Community Engagement)

T.A.P. (Talk About the Problems), the ISJL’s peer mediation program, trains students to help their peers resolve conflicts peacefully. The peer-led-model is really important to us, but even when the youth are leading, they are not alone. There are many partners in making T.A.P. successful – and one of the greatest recent elements is the way we’ve been connecting legal professionals with the project.

L-R: Dr. LeSian Chase, Counselor, Whitten Middle School, Malkie Schwartz, Director, ISJL Dept. of Community Engagement, Judge Carlton Reeves, Gernelle Nelson, AmeriCorps member, ISJL Dept. of Community Engagement and Mr. Anthony Moore, Principal, Whitten Middle School

L-R: Dr. LeSian Chase, Counselor, Whitten Middle School, Malkie Schwartz, Director, ISJL Dept. of Community Engagement, Judge Carlton Reeves, Gernelle Nelson, AmeriCorps member, ISJL Dept. of Community Engagement and Mr. Anthony Moore, Principal, Whitten Middle School

There are many benefits to involving legal professionals in community engagement programs like T.A.P., but two stand out for me. The first is that legal professionals can be role models for the students – or, as we sometimes say now, the aspiring lawyers! Here in Mississippi, as in many places, it is not uncommon to find middle school students who have never met a law school student, a lawyer or a judge—particularly students who live in neighborhoods with high poverty rates. Meeting a legal professional can inspire students to explore the possibility of entering the field of law, and can make the profession more accessible to them; all the more so when we have volunteers who are relatable, because they share the same race, or gender, or background and life experiences. Another benefit is that students see legal professionals engaged in peaceful conflict resolution. TV programs and movies often portray lawyers as adversarial and aggressive; real, live legal professionals can emphasize that mediation and finding a more peaceful solution are their daily working goals.

Last week, Judge Carlton Reeves helped us launch T.A.P. at Whitten Middle School. The mediators had completed a training conducted by members of Mississippi College School of Law’s Black Law Student Association. To recognize the students’ achievements and to signal the start of their responsibilities as mediators, Judge Reeves administered an oath during which they committed to, among other things, maintain confidentiality.

Judge Carlton Reeves helped set the tone for the program by encouraging the students to utilize the program and take it seriously. By administering this oath, Judge Reeves demonstrated his commitment to peaceful conflict resolution and showed students that they too can enter the legal profession as a lawyer and perhaps even as a judge.

After all, like the students, Judge Reeves grew up in Mississippi. He attended college and law school before going into private practice in Jackson, Mississippi. In 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Judge Reeves to serve as a federal court judge, making him the second African American to be appointed to the Federal Court of the Southern District of Mississippi.

Having the Judge “preside” over our ceremony at Whitten Middle School put a face to the notion of potential for these students, and to the notion of community engagement for us all.

Who are some of your role models? Do you see yourself as a role model for others?

Posted on March 7, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

All Aboard “The Health Express”!

This update comes to us from AmeriCorps member Gernelle Nelson. For her year of national service, she’s working in the Community Engagement Department at the ISJL.

Greetings from the Community Engagement Department!

I am proud to announce that The Health Express, our peer-to-peer education publication, is now available to read online! This year, we began working on implementing a health initiative at Blackburn Middle School. This initiative focuses on empowering students with knowledge about physical health, establishing healthy eating habits, and promoting a safe environment. Rather than have the information just given to them by the adults, this is a peer-to-peer learning model: students are the ones researching and learning about healthy living, and they’re also the ones sharing their new knowledge with their peers and community via a student-published blog and magazine.

With the help of Bertha Hardy-Smith, Blackburn’s health teacher, we designated a small group of students to participate in the program. During my first months working with the students, we focused on teaching them the basic principles of publishing. The students came up with possible article topics, conducted focus group research and received staff positions and duties. The students began writing their first set of articles and named their publication “The Health Express.”

Health Express Ticket

Our partnership with the School of Nursing at the University of Mississippi Medical Center begins this week. Through this partnership, the middle school students will have the opportunity to work with health professionals as they continue to generate more articles for The Health Express. We have started working towards getting the Health Express printed and distributed throughout the Jackson Public Schools district at the end of this school year.

We are very proud of the work our students have produced thus far – and we hope throughout the community, folks will be excited to get on board with The Health Express!

Please feel free to leave comments and questions on The Health Express blog – the students will love it! 

 

Posted on February 6, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy