Tag Archives: education

Sukkot Guest List: Will You Invite Challenging Conversations?

Sukkot offers some incredible starting points for discussion. The Sukkot holiday begins tonight and lasts for a week. Among other things, core to Sukkot is the sukkah itself: something that provides shelter, but is temporary.

mendel-sukkah

One topic the ISJL’s curriculum focuses on is the concept of Ushpizin. This is the custom of inviting our ancestors into our Sukkah. While the traditional Ushpizin guests are biblical characters, it sets a precedent for inviting people who add value to our life into our personal dwelling, to allow them to help shape it and shape us.

This got me thinking. There are so many people who have been involved in social action and who have led various social justice campaigns, so… as someone committed to social justice, who would I want to invite into my temporary dwelling to sit and have some coffee and cake with and learn.Which also made me wonder – maybe even more importantly than the question of who would I invite in, is the question what would we talk about while we were in there?

I started Googling Sukkot and Jewish social activists, and what I came across is the group Jewish Women Watching and their 2007 Sukkot campaign, “Treyfing Sukkot.” I’d be curious to hear what you think. Jewish Women Watching had an interesting approach to Sukkot: “Sukkot is a time when we step outside of our comfort zones. We need to go beyond ʻsafe causesʼ and challenge the status quo.”

The campaign included sukkah decorations that highlighted causes that were, at the time, “kosher,” i.e. “safe causes”; while other decorations listed causes that were “treyf” – more polarizing, less “safe.” These decorations presented a real challenge to the Jewish community and Jewish individuals. From a quick glance at their website, it doesn’t look as though Jewish Women Watching is still an active group. However, one line quoted in the press release that announced this campaign stood out to me.

“The sukkah is a fragile dwelling, and for it to be kosher, it must be open.”

If our sukkah is truly open, who would we invite in? And would we only explore the safe, kosher questions or the challenging, treyf ones?

Who would you add to the Ushpizin guest list? What might you want to talk with them about?

Posted on September 18, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Operation Understanding

Every summer, the ISJL office is privileged to be one of the stops on the journey of teens participating in Operation Understanding.

Operation Understanding, which has sites in Philadelphia, PA, and Washington, D.C., brings together African American and Jewish youth, who spend time learning together first in their own communities, then traveling to visit civil rights sites. They learn about each other’s cultures and unique legacies, and also find common ground in their shared values and experiences.

As the students who participate in OU know all too well, while as a society we’ve made tremendous strides there is still so much work to be done. Working together, across racial, religious, and other potential “divides” that can instead become uniting, we can move forward. The painful realization that divisions still exist and the hopeful knowledge that unity is possible inspired this video, put together by OU-D.C. students.

They shared it with us when they visited the ISJL office, and we’re honored to share the #TrayvOnward video here:

You can also keep up with the Operation Understanding Students on their blog, which shares the lessons and adventures of their journey.

Posted on July 31, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Gorillas, Bananas, Jewish Education

Sometimes, being a Jewish organization in the Deep South means being perceived as an “outsider”– outside the major metropolitan areas, far from the largest centers of Jewish life. But what we know is that wherever we are, the struggles and triumphs faced by Jewish communities of all sizes are similar. South, North, East, West.

ejpThat’s why the ISJL staff was thrilled to get to contribute a think piece to E-Jewish Philanthropy about how we’re addressing Jewish education issues here in the South that are prevalent issue, and how there are no Southern solutions or Northern solutions– just communal, collaborative solutions.

If that’s not enough to catch your attention, what if we tell you that the piece is called “Giving Our Gorilla a Much-Needed Banana“?

We would love for our Southern & Jewish blog readers do join the conversation, too: do you think large and small communities can work together? Though there are cultural differences that make our regions unique and interesting, on issues of Jewish identity and education can our similarities outweigh our geographic differences?

Posted on July 17, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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