Tag Archives: communities

From Utica, NY to Utica, MS: How A Rabbi Spent His Summer Vacation

Today’s guest post comes from Rabbi Hank Bamberger of Utica, New York, who spent some time traveling in the South this summer as part of the ISJL’s Rabbis on the Road program. A version of this piece first appeared in the newsletter of the National Association of Retired Reform Rabbis, and is shared here with permission.

“You’re going WHERE in July?”

We couldn’t blame people for reacting that way. The answer was that my wife Sheila and I would be visiting four small congregations in four southern states – Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas – with a side trip to the URJ’s Jacobs Camp in Utica, MS, all this under the auspices of the Institute of Southern Jewish Life – and all during the summer.

My friend and colleague Rabbi David Klein, who had served as the rabbi in Monroe, LA, sent us an email assuring us that it would only be hot outside. No one else was that encouraging.

utica

In spite of the heat concerns, we headed South – and we enjoyed ourselves thoroughly. Wherever we went, we were welcomed with true Southern hospitality. Each of the two Erev Shabbat services I conducted drew about a dozen and a half people. That may not sound like many, but percentage wise, it’s a lot. Consider this: Congregation Meir Chaim in McGehee, AR, has only seven families on its membership list!

Adult education in three congregations produced slightly lower numbers (!) but great enthusiasm. Talk at meals ranged from dealing with congregational matters to local and regional Jewish history to, inevitably, mutual acquaintances.

We even made some time to be tourists. The Clinton Library in Little Rock is worth a trip in itself, and if you go, the Little Rock Zoo is very nice as well. Of course, we saw lots of countryside. In nine days, we logged just over 1,500 miles of driving.

To top everything else off, the weather was mild (for summer in the South). Since our trip occurred during the terrible heat wave in the Northeast, it was hotter in Utica, NY than in Utica, MS. Go figure!

In short, we felt that we had made a contribution to those small congregations which work so hard to survive. A great way to spend our summer vacation, and I encourage other clergy interested in the Rabbis on the Road program to contact Rabbi Marshal Klaven at the ISJL.

Posted on September 30, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

It’s a Trans-denominational, Multi-congregational, Inter-generational Havdalah Service

By Education Fellow Amanda Winer

The title of this post sounds like a Broadway song, doesn’t it?

It actually describes a recent program that we had the pleasure of organizing for two partner congregations in South Texas—Temple Beth El in Brownsville (unaffiliated) and Temple Emanuel in McAllen (Reform).

Second year Education Fellow Erin Kahal and I coordinated our spring visits to Brownsville and McAllen, respectively, and we put together this great Havdalah service on South Padre Island as a joint program for our communities. We thought it would be nice to share some pictures from the event.

The beautiful sea side setting for Havdalah

The beautiful seaside setting for our Havdalah service.

Notice the braided border on this invitation.  Very Havdalah-themed.

Notice the braided border on this invitation. Very Havdalah-themed.

Me and Erin at the beach.

Me and Erin at the beach.

We had participants of all ages.

We had participants of all ages.

The ceremony distinguishes between the holiness of Shabbat and the everyday nature of the new week.

The ceremony distinguishes between the holiness of Shabbat and the everyday nature of the new week.

Tessa Galloso, 13, headed up the snack committee.

Tessa Galloso (center), 13, headed up the snack committee.

Each student was responsible for one of the Havdalah sets.

Each student was responsible for one of the Havdalah sets.

Participants reading from a handout with appropriate songs and blessings.

Participants read from handouts with appropriate songs and blessings.

We had an amazing time bringing these two communities together!

We had an amazing time bringing these two communities together!

Thanks again to everyone who helped make this program possible!

Posted on April 24, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Seminole’s Henry Katz Shares Stories with Style

Since the 1940s, the Jews of Seminole, Ada, Nowata, and Shawnee, Oklahoma, have met at the Seminole Hebrew Center for religious services and social events.  In the clip below, which is featured on our Online Encyclopedia article for Ada/Seminole, lifelong Ada resident Henry Katz talks about the origins of the Hebrew Center.

I love this excerpt for a number of reasons. Katz, who descends from German-speaking immigrants who arrived in the United States after the Civil War, alludes to the distinction between his decidedly Reform family and the newer arrivals, who were more observant. Then, as evidence of his family’s assimilation, he uses the word “phylacteries” to describe what most traditional Jews would call “tefillin.”  As a professor once told me, “no one who wears phylacteries says “phylacteries.”  

The story also illustrates the influence of economics on Jewish (and general) migration patterns. In this case, the arrival of recent immigrants to the booming towns above the Seminole oil field influenced the development of the local Jewish community.

Apparently, people used to play a lot of cards.  Bridge, canasta, all types of poker—nearly everyone I speak with reports that they or their parents participated in regular card games, inside or outside the Jewish community.  Katz attributes the men’s gambling habits to the oil business, which is a clever connection to make.  I would also point out that many of these men were also immigrants from Eastern Europe; it was a gamble, or a series of them, that had brought them to Oklahoma in the first place.

Finally, Katz has a great voice and tells his story with real style.  Reviewing his interview and putting together this clip brought back memories of a pleasant morning spent in Ada at the end of a successful research trip to Oklahoma.

I’d like to thank Henry Katz for sharing his story with us.  Credit is also due to summer oral history intern Jonayah Jackson for the quality of the video.

Posted on December 5, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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